You are here

Coshnet's Blog

How the Indiana state OSHA plan can improve its protection of workers

Ron Shawgo of The Journal Gazette in Fort Wayne, Ind., has a set of articles today highlighting the state’s workplace safety agency’s decline in inspections and fines.

After recent spate of miner deaths in West Virginia, new safety rules desperately needed

Coal Miners, Photo by Earl DotterIn the past two weeks, four miners have been killed on the job in West Virginia. In response, West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin ordered a halt in production this week – for one hour – to review safety laws and procedures.

Immigration reform must include protections for rights of immigrant workers

Immigration workers' rights protestA new report out today by the International Labor Recruitment Working Group, which is made up of organizations working in various industries and with workers across employment sectors and visa categories, highlights the wide range of abuses endured by immigrant workers.

Much ado about the proposed -- and delayed -- silica rule

silica-dust-ruleAs you all know well by now, today is the two-year anniversary of the proposed silica rule, which would protect workers from exposure to dangerous levels of silica dust on the job, being sent to the Office of Management and Budget's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA). Unfortunately, in those two years, nothing has happened on the regulatory level. OIRA was supposed to review the proposed rule in 90 days. It has now been 730.

Signs of change in Obama’s State of the Union address

Now safely in his second term, the whole country – National COSH included – seems to be studying President Barack Obama to see signs of whether he’s changed and what that means for the remainder of his tenure. And tonight, during his State of the Union address, we’ll get a peek at Obama’s post-election priorities. 

As we hit two years of silica rule at OIRA, what will you do?

There are a couple more great stories and blog posts to highlight today on the silica rule.

The AFL-CIO's Peg Seminario was featured in an NPR story this morning about the delay in the silica rule and the countless workers who are affected in the meantime.

New findings show us how to reduce silica exposure as we wait for White House to act

Photo by www.EarlDotter.comAs we wait for the Obama administration to issue a standard to protect American workers from exposure to dangerous levels of silica dust on the job (

20th anniversary of FMLA

Today is the 20th anniversary of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), which gives workers time off to care for a newborn or newly adopted child, sick relative, or their own illness. At the time, FMLA was a groundbreaking provision that protected workers who needed to attend to family or medical needs from losing their jobs. Today, it's time for an update. 

We, the People need to stop on-the-job silica exposure

Silica dust. You may not have heard from it, but you likely know someone affected by exposure to it, which can lead to silicosis, lung cancer, and other debilitating diseases.

Workers can be exposed to dangerous levels of silica dust through cutting, drilling, grinding, or otherwise disturbing material that might contain silica, such as during construction jobs.

Record fines for Chevron's refinery fire at the same time company brings in record profits

Money has been slipping through Chevron’s fingers, it seems, as it continues to pay for an August fire in Richmond, Calif., that sent hydrocarbons and black smoke through surrounding cities and jeopardized the lives of workers and community members alike.

Pages