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December 2018

Safety + Health: Groups oppose DOL proposal to allow teens to operate powered patient lifts -- 12/10/18

Workers unions, the National Employment Law Project, and the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health are among the groups publicly opposing a Department of Labor proposed rule that would allow unsupervised teens to operate powered patient lifts in hospitals, nursing homes or other long-term care facilities.

CommonWealth Magazine:  Poor role modeling in tech school renovation -- 12/08/18

In Massachusetts last year, construction accidents accounted for one-third, or 21 out of 74, of workplace fatalities, according to a 2018 report from Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health and the Massachusetts AFL-CIO.

EHS Today: Does Amazon Care About Worker Safety? -- 12/07/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) placed Amazon on its 2018 “Dirty Dozen" report of "employers who put workers and communities at risk."

The Week:  Are Amazon’s warehouse robots a threat to its workers? -- 12/07/18

In April The US National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, a labour advocacy group, announced in August that Amazon topped its annual “Dirty Dozen” list highlighting companies that it believes put workers especially at risk because of unsafe labour practices. The organisation counted seven deaths that have occurred at US Amazon facilities since 2013, including three at separate locations in the span of five weeks in 2017.

Digital Journal: Amazon bear repellent accident sends 24 workers to the hospital -- 12/07/18

Click Lancashire:  Amazon robot punctures can of bear repellent, hospitalizes 24 workers -- 12/07/18

RT:  Robot uprising? Amazon warehouse bot sends 24 human employees to hospital with bear mace -- 12/07/18

USA Today: Bear spray incident at NJ Amazon warehouse shines light on safety record -- 12/05/18

Business Insider: 54 workers became sick and one is in critical condition after a can of bear repellent exploded in an Amazon warehouse -- 12/05/18

The company has come under fire for its workplace practices before. A report released earlier this year by the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, a private nonprofit worker advocacy group, named Amazon as one of its "dirty dozen" companies. Amazon landed on the list for what the report called a "disturbing pattern of preventable deaths," noting that seven Amazon workers had died on or near the job since 2013.

November 2018

Times Union: Amazon got a hostile welcome from a New York labor union, which savaged its working conditions as 'deadly and dehumanizing'
 -- 11/29/18

The union pointed to what it sees as a pattern of preventable deaths at Amazon warehouses, citing a National Council for Occupational Safety and Health investigation that found seven people had died working in Amazon's fulfillment centers.

Stamford Advocate: Amazon got a hostile welcome from a New York labor union, which savaged its working conditions as 'deadly and dehumanizing' -- 11/29/18

Business Insider: Amazon got a hostile welcome from a New York labor union, which savaged its working conditions as 'deadly and dehumanizing' -- 11/29/18

The Nation: How Brown University Students and Dining Workers Got Better Working Conditions—Together -- 11/14/18

The Rhode Island Committee on Occupational Safety and Health co-signed the petition, but its director, James Celenza, says action from federal regulators “could take years.”

lohud:  With workplace fatalities up, BOCES buckles down on safety with 'model' forestry program -- 11/14/18

Technical programs like the one at BOCES are essential to ensuring safety is a fundamental part of workplace training in dangerous fields, said Rachel Terhart, a staff trainer at Western New York Council on Occupational Safety and Health.

The Center for Public Integrity: ‘The good, the bad and the ugly’ of state worker safety programs -- 11/12/18

“You get the good, the bad and the ugly with state plans,” said Marcy Goldstein-Gelb, co-executive director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, an advocacy group. “You have the opportunity to add protections you may or may not get at the federal level. The flip side is that state plans are much more subject to politics, in implementation and budget.”...Peter Dooley, a senior project coordinator with the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health who helped Hinton’s sister-in-law, Ingrid Rope, obtain investigative documents from the state, said the industrial commission’s reduction of the fine from $7,000 “sends the wrong message to employers that put their workers at risk.”

Supply Chain Dive: Baltimore warehouse tragedy draws attention to Amazon's safety record -- 11/06/18

Earlier this year, The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (COSH) put Amazon at the top of its "Dirty Dozen" list of companies that "put workers and communities at risk due to unsafe practices."..."We need more resources for research, training and enforcement, not less," said Marcy Goldstein-Gelb, co-executive director of National COSH in a statement. "Otherwise, employers like the Dirty Dozen get the message that it’s okay to cut corners on workplace safety. It’s not okay — ever — when a worker doesn’t come home to his or her family." 

Engadget: Report claims Tesla's medical clinic denied factory workers care -- 11/05/18

In April, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health named Tesla one of the most dangerous places to work in the US and cited Reveal's previous report in its assessment.

Daily Mail: Robots are replacing holiday workers at Amazon with the online retailer hiring 20,000 fewer staff to tackle this year's Christmas rush, says analyst -- 11/05/18

The New Yorker: If Jeff Bezos Makes Washington the Second Headquarters of Amazon  --11/03/18

In April, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, a worker-advocacy nonprofit, named Amazon one of the worst companies in America for worker safety, citing seven deaths that have occured in Amazon facilities since 2013.

ISHN: National COSH announces 2018 Health and Safety awards -- 11/01/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) has announced the winners of its 2018 Health and Safety awards, recognizing outstanding contributions towards empowering workers and the fight for safer workplaces and communities.

October 2018

ISHN: Advocacy group slams Amazon’s worker safety record -- 10/05/18

Amazon, the retail giant which announced this week an across-the-board wage increase to $15 an hour for all employees, must also pay “urgent attention” to workplace safety issues, says the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH). “Amazon workers desperately need a real pay increase,” said Marcy Goldstein-Gelb, co-executive director of National COSH, a nationwide training and advocacy organization for workers and families. “But a pay increase is worth a lot more if you come home in one piece at the end of your shift.”...

NH Labor News:  Amazon Must Address Safety Concerns, Says National COSH -- 10/05/18

“Once again, it’s the start of Amazon’s busy holiday shipping season, with all the dangers that creates,” said Peter Dooley, safety and health project consultant at National COSH. “The pressure to move products will be intense inside the company’s warehouses. After seven preventable deaths, the company must implement a program that eliminates all preventable illnesses, injuries and fatalities. And workers need to be part of that program for it to work.”

Engadget: Tesla will have to defend itself against claims of foreign worker abuse -- 10/03/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety has also named Tesla one of the most dangerous places to work in the US.

Patch: Amazon $15 Minimum Wage: Pay Hike Comes After Years Of Criticism -- 10/02/18

In 2013, the nonprofit National Council for Occupational Safety and Health found that seven Amazon employees died while working in warehouses.

September 2018

Gizmodo: Report: Elon Musk, Tesla Exec Discussed Promoting Union Advocates Rather Than 'Work to Pull in the UAW' -- 09/27/18

The labor agency’s complaint against Musk alleges that the company illegally retaliated against union advocates at Tesla’s plant, which has been noted to have an abnormally high injury rate for the industry and was named by the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health as one of the most dangerous U.S. workplaces.

EHS Daily Advisor:  The Bar Has Been Raised for NYC Construction Training -- 09/26/18

The topic has been tracked by the New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (NYCOSH). In a January 2018 report, NYCOSH said the previous year had seen an “epidemic of construction fatalities,” mainly outside NYC...Conversely, in the remainder of the state, which does not have an equivalent agency, NYCOSH says fatalities were at a record high.

CityLab: Why Hurricanes Hit Immigrants Hardest -- 09/20/18

To better navigate exploitative conditions, Eduardo worked with a local community organization, Fe y Justicia Worker Center, which did trainings with day laborers and other workers.

The Guardian: A year after Hurricane Harvey, some cleanup workers are still unpaid -- 09/19/18

“When any devastation happens, it’s a time to reevaluate how we are doing things,” said Sylvia Chicas, an organizer with the Fe y Justicia Worker Center in Houston. “In a way, it’s an opportunity for our city to start thinking about are we rebuilding in an equitable way, to bring workers into this conversation in a way that they have traditionally been excluded.”...“It’s been really inspiring,” said Marianela Acuña-Arreaza, the 29-year-old executive director of Fe y Justicia Worker Center, who came to the US as an undocumented immigrant from Venezuela when she was 18 years old.

The Nation: Dangerous Jobs Also Put Workers at Risk of Opioid Dependency -- 09/17/18

According to an analysis by the advocacy group Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (MassCOSH): “workers are unable to take time off to heal and work though their pain, exacerbating their injuries and increasing their medication intake, leading to addiction.”...According to Jeff Newton of MassCOSH, in the dangerous workplaces that the group monitors, the downward spiral of opioids often starts with the banal aches and pains that come with a bad fall or pulled muscle: “We have many members who state how common it is to be given pills after an injury, then find themselves unable to stop due to stress, pain, and other issues.”

Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette: Longtime residents face deportation -- 09/11/18

Caceres joined speakers from across the U.S. at a stop in Springdale by the "Journey for Justice" national bus tour, which advocates for families like his where a parent has lost "temporary protection status." The group's Springdale stop was hosted by the Northwest Arkansas Workers Justice Center.

Construction Citizen:  First Wage Theft Charges in Harris County History Brought Against Million-Dollar Homeowner for Refusing to Pay House Painter -- 09/07/18

Miya Shay, a reporter from Houston ABC affiliate KTRK-TV, talked with Marianela Acuna of Fe y Justicia Worker Center in Houston. Acuna explained why those that commit wage theft believe that they will not be caught. She said: “The person who is committing the crime is well aware of the power that they have in the relationship and the need and the dependence that the workers have on the job that they are holding.” She said that employers think they can get away with wage theft because they know that workers need the job and are vulnerable, so they are afraid to speak out. Victims of wage theft can contact organizations such as Fe y Justicia Worker Center, the AFL-CIO’s Texas Gulf Coast Area Labor Federation, and the Worker Defense Fund, as well as local police, so that offenders can be prosecuted...When the painter refused to do the additional work with no further compensation, Nicholas became upset and told him to leave. The painter then asked for help from the Fe y Justicia Worker Center and the Southside Place Police Department.

Houston Public Media: Prosecutors File First Wage Theft Case in Harris County -- 09/05/18

The painter then asked for help from the Fe y Justicia Worker Center and the Southside Place Police Department.

CNET: Amazon and Bernie Sanders at it again: Sanders introduces 'Stop BEZOS Act' -- 09/05/18

Democracy Now: As Amazon Hits $1 Trillion in Value, Its Warehouse Workers Denounce “Slavery” Conditions -- 09/05/18

The deaths prompted the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health to place Amazon on their “Dirty Dozen” list for 2018.

WGRZ: Iron Workers Union calls out Wendt Corp. before Labor Day Parade -- 09/03/18

While the recent findings delineated in the Western New York Council on Occupational Safety and Health (WNYCOSH) report released today by Iron Workers Shopmens Local 576 are respected, after review, WENDT is firm that its current level of safety compliance is in full accordance with OSHA standards.

Cheektowaga Chronicle: Town board called “woefully uninformed” in their support of Wendt workers -- 09/03/18

“We have a report from [Western New York Council of Occupational Safety and Health], a local workplace safety organization, and their report showed that there were 32 incidents reported at Wendt between 2013 and 2017,” said Mr. Nowak.

August 2018

Vanity Fair: Bernie Sanders is Officially Getting Under Jeff Bezos's Skin -- 08/3018

Since 2013, according to the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, seven people have died on the job in Amazon warehouses.

CNET: Day 2: Bernie Sanders and Amazon trade more jabs over wages, working conditions  -- 08/30/18

Amazon's warehouses are on the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health's list of most dangerous places to work in the US, he noted.

Nation of Change: Progressive Briefing for Thursday, August 30 -- 09/30/18

Common Dreams:  Sanders vs. Amazon Intensifies as Senator Stands With Struggling Workers Against World's Richest Man -- 08/29/18

Business Insider: Bernie Sanders strikes back at Amazon, calling the retail giant's treatment of employees 'absurd' -- 08/29/18

While Amazon contended its workplaces were safe, Sanders highlighted incidents at the company's fulfillment centers. "Amazon's warehouses are on the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health's list of most dangerous places to work in the United States," the statement said. "According to the NCOSH, seven Amazon workers have died on or near the job since 2013, including three workers within five weeks at three separate locations last year."

Engadget: Amazon: Bernie Sanders' working conditions claims are ‘misleading’ -- 08/29/18

In April, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health named Amazon one of the most dangerous places to work in the US based on its warehouse conditions.

Business Insider: Bernie Sanders escalates war with Amazon, says he will ask OSHA to investigate 'unsafe working conditions' in warehouses -- 08/29/18

Sanders cites a report from the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health that came out in April that found seven Amazon warehouse workers who died on the job in Amazon's warehouses since 2013.

CBS News:  Amazon calls out Bernie Sanders for "misleading accusations" -- 08/29/18

In his statement, Sanders also pointed to "disturbing stories about working conditions at fulfillment centers run by Amazon and its contractors," noting that they rank on the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health's list of most dangerous places to work in the U.S.

Houston Chronicle: UT study aims to stop human trafficking chains related to Hurricane Harvey construction projects -- 08/29/18

Fe y Justicia Worker Center, which advocates for workers who were exploited during Hurricane Harvey, will also assist with research.

UT News:  Human Trafficking in Harvey’s Wake: UT Study Aims to Disrupt Supply Networks -- 08/28/18

“We saw employers exploiting workers after Ike, and we are seeing it again with Harvey. Wage theft is devastating for workers, many of whom live locally and are recovering from Harvey themselves,” said Marianela Acuña Arreaza, executive director of Fe y Justicia Worker Center, a group that plans to assist with the research and may be able to use the findings to inform their work.

The Pump Handle: On a rainy Saturday, painful tears, important lessons for Boston’s immigrant workers -- 8/14/18

At that moment, Barreto’s work wasn’t about job safety or wage theft or the economy or any of the other important issues that draw people to trainings held by the Immigrant Worker Center, a project of the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health, known as MassCOSH...Barreto’s boss, Jodi Sugerman-Brozan, MassCOSH’s executive director, explained: “We’re not case workers. “We’re not social service providers. We’re dedicated to building a movement for worker justice,” a movement that requires leadership from workers.

Courthouse News Service: Construction Sector Leads in Massachusetts Opioid Deaths -- 08/10/18

“This sobering report confirms that hazardous jobs are not just dangerous because of the risk of fatal injury, but because they can also directly lead to tragic opioid addiction that can shatter families and end lives,” Jodi Sugerman-Brozan, executive director of the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health, said in a statement.

Workers' Comp Hub: Proscribing Prescriptions or Promoting Public Health? Opioid Treatment in Workers’ Comp -- 8/10/18

As the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (MassCOSH) explains, “inadequate workers compensation systems and the fear of losing their job leads people to return to work before they are healed and to work in pain, depending on painkillers to get through their day, leading to addiction and overdose.”...As MassCOSH emphasizes in its 2018 Dying for Work report, safe, healthy workplaces and appropriate, comprehensive, timely treatment of workplace injuries are essential to reducing injured workers’ reliance on painkillers. 

New York Magazine: Rate of Babies Born to Opioid Addicted Mothers Quadruples -- 8/09/18

Jodi Sugerman-Brozan, executive director of the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health, told the Boston Herald there a few things the state should do to address this problem, such as require “employers to keep five years of workplace injury records, increase access to paid sick leave and empower unions.”

Boston Herald: Dangerous jobs face heightened opioid use -- 8/09/18

“This sobering report confirms that hazardous jobs are not just dangerous because of the risk of fatal injury, but because they can also directly lead to tragic opioid addiction that can shatter families and end lives,” said Jodi Sugerman-Brozan, executive director of the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health.

The Pump Handle: In Boston, teens advocate for healthy schools, healthy workplaces -- 8/09/18

Ramirez’ enhanced respect for his teachers has its source in a summer program, Teens Lead at Work, known as TL@W, run by the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (MassCOSH)....“MassCOSH is one of our most vital and appreciated partners around healthy schools,” Walsh told them, before asking them what they saw as important in a healthy school environment.  Well educated because of TL@W, they responded with healthy food choices, clean bathrooms, good air and water quality, trees and outdoor space, clean energy, and non-toxic cleaning chemicals.

Splinter: Workplace Injuries Tied to Increased Chance of Opiate Overdose In Landmark New Study -- 8/09/18

“There is a lot of pressure to work in pain,” Jodi Sugerman-Brozan, executive director of the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health, told the Boston Globe on Wednesday. “Construction is the occupation in which people have the highest rate of work-related injury and the highest rate of work-related fatality... Reducing workplace injury is a key strategy to reduce opioid use and addiction.”

Boston Real Estate Times: Dangerous Jobs Directly Linked to Opiate Epidemic in Massachusetts -- 8/08/18

The Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (MassCOSH) was provided an advance copy of the document as a stakeholder working to better understand the role work plays in the region’s opioid epidemic. “This sobering report confirms that hazardous jobs are not just dangerous because of the risk of fatal injury, but because they can also directly lead to tragic opioid addiction that can shatter families and end lives,” said MassCOSH Executive Director Jodi Sugerman-Brozan. “It also makes clear that if those working to end the opioid epidemic in our state are not looking at investing in policies and efforts that reduce work-related injuries, they are missing a key strategy.”

Fortune: Amazon Worker Who Became Homeless After Workplace Injury Speaks Out -- 8/01/18

Amazon maintained that workers’ safety is its “number one priority.” But the company was added to a 2018 list of “Employers Who Put Workers and Communities at Risk,” compiled by the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health.

July 2018

KSL.com: Amazon begins hiring process for 1,500 jobs in SLC -- 7/31/18

It also cited the National Council of Occupational Safety and Health, which reported seven workers have been killed in workplace accidents since 2013, including three between September and October 2017.

The Guardian: Accidents at Amazon: workers left to suffer after warehouse injuries -- 7/30/18

Amazon’s warehouses were listed on the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health’s “dirty dozen” list of most dangerous places to work in the United States in April 2018.

Carbonated.TV: Amazon Workers Accuse Company Of Pushing Them Into Homelessness 

Still, Amazon has a long history of being hard on workers; it's one of the top 12 most dangerous workplaces in the United States, according to the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health.

Sun News: Amazon Under the Spotlight for Unsafe Working Conditons -- 7/30/18

There are numerous reports from Amazon workers of being improperly treated after an avoidable work injury. Amazon’s warehouses were listed on the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health’s “dirty dozen” list of most dangerous places to work in the United States in April 2018. According to the list, seven workers have been killed at Amazon warehouses since 2013 – including three workers within five weeks at three separate locations in 2017.

Boston Real Estate Times: Construction Worker Dies in Confined Space on the Job at Emerson Hospital -- 7/22/18

The death of a 46-year-old worker on Wednesday while working at at Emerson Hospital in Concord, MA is heartbreaking and shows more must be done to protect workers said the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety & Health (MassCOSH) in a statement...Our hearts go out to the family and friends of this man,” said MassCOSH’s Executive Director Jodi Sugerman-Brozan. “Tragic events like should remind everyone that dangerous jobs are not a thing of the past; thousands of workers put themselves in dangerous situations for their employer every day and sadly, some never make it back home. No one should have to die for a paycheck and we should commit ourselves as a community to ending unsafe jobs once and for all.”

Brand-E: Striking Amazon in its Prime -- 7/18/18

And in the US, Amazon is one most-dangerous places to work in the US, according to a National Council for Occupational Safety and Health report. The organisation reported seven workers killed at warehouses since 2013, including three within five weeks in 2017.

The Citizen: Bezos named ‘richest man in modern history’ as his workers strike for pay -- 7/18/18

Meanwhile, in America, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health named Amazon as one of the most dangerous places to work in the country.

Engadget: Amazon founder Jeff Bezos is now the richest person in recent history -- 7/17/18 

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health recently determined that Amazon was one of the most dangerous places to work in the US, pointing to the deaths of seven warehouse workers as well as high injury rates and overwork.

Engadget: Amazon warehouse workers in Europe stage protest on Prime Day -- 7/16/18

Just earlier this year, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health named Amazon as one of the most dangerous places to work for in the US, citing seven warehouse workers' deaths since 2013.

La Crosse Tribune: Poultry processing workers face injuries in Wisconsin, nationwide -- 7/16/18

Almost two-thirds of cutters and over half of all deboners and hangers reported being injured on the job, according to a report by the Northwest Arkansas Workers Justice Center examining working conditions in that state’s poultry processing plants, where Tyson is based.

WBKW Buffalo: Four deaths in three weeks: what to know about workplace safety in Western New York -- 7/13/18

The Western New York Council on Occupational Safety and Health (WNYCOSH) is a non-profit that works to educate employees about their rights and employers about what they should be doing to ensure a safe workplace. Germain Harnden, the council's executive director, said the most important thing is for workers to understand their rights under the law. "I think it's all about learning, getting properly trained, knowing what your rights are [and] not being afraid to ask for information," she said.

Spectrum News Buffalo:  Wendt employees want safer working conditions -- 7/12/18

A report released by the Western New York Council on Occupational Safety and Health shows that 32 incidents were recorded at the facility between 2013 and 2017.

WBFO: WNYCOSH report critical of Cheektowaga metal recycling company -- 7/12/18

After a nearly four-month study of safety records, worker interviews, a facility walk-through and a review of industry best practices, the Western New York Council on Safety and Heath has released a report critical of the Wendt Corporation in Cheektowaga..."In February we were approached by the workers of the Wendt Corporation, who were recently unionized by the Iron Workers Local 576," said WNYCOSH Program Director Brian Brown-Cashdollar. "They've been concerned about the health and safety conditions in the plant and the employer's either reluctance or unwillingness to adequately address them."

News Click: Shocked, Burnt and Bruised: the Plight of Workers at Tesla’s Plants -- 7/10/18

The 2018 annual report of The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, which identified Tesla as one of the 12 most dangerous workplaces in the US that puts its employees at risk of physical injuries, pointed out that the rate of recordable injuries was 31% higher than the industry average in 2016, while the rate of serious injuries was 83% higher...“Relying on 2017 injury data to reach any conclusions about safety trends at the plant is premature and could have misleading results,” said Worksafe's report, which pointed to many irregularities in the way in which the injury logs were maintained by the company.

Public News Service: Workers' Advocates: Ark. Budget Surplus Leaves Out Low-Wage Earners -- 7/09/18

But while the money is no doubt needed to support a variety of state programs and services, Cynthia Martinez, development coordinator for the Northwest Arkansas Workers Justice Center, says the surplus has come at a cost to low-wage workers. "We are the ones who are providing the surplus,” she states. “The breakdown of the money shows that very little is coming in from the corporate incomes. Most – the majority of it – is coming from individual income taxes."..."Despite having multimillion dollar corporations here in the state, the state is still poor compared to other states in the country,” she points out. “So, the surplus is good news, but it's still coming off the backs of low-wage workers."

Hers Magazine:  Low-Wage Workers Join ‘Our Turn’ to Stop Abuse -- 7/05/18

Our Turn is a sexual harassment action network that was convened by the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH).

WorkersCompensation.com: MA: Second Tree Worker Killed on the Job -- 7/02/18

The death of a David Bova, 34, of Salem, NH, in Rowley, MA is a tragic reminder that working at heights remains a very dangerous job and that it is essential that employers take the time to carefully implement OSHA-required safety measures, said the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety & Health (MassCOSH) in a statement released today.

Worchester Business Journal: Group highlights recent tree worker deaths -- 7/2/18

MassCOSH, a local coalition for occupational safety and health, said on Friday that the death of David Bova, 34, who fell 50 feet from a tree while working outside a home in Rowley, should prompt enhanced safety measures among employers. An Occupational Safety and Health Administration official said an investigation into Bova's death is underway. "Over the years, we have seen too many tree workers die needlessly on the job," Jodi Sugerman-Brozan, executive director of MassCOSH, said in a statement. "We demand employers in this field use every safety precaution to keep their workers safe."

June 2018

Ms. Magazine: It’s Their Turn: Low-Wage Workers Launched a Coalition to Fight Sexual Harassment -- 6/28/18

First came #MeToo. Then, #TimesUp. Now, another rallying cry has emerged in the fight against sexual harassment: Our Turn. The new campaign, launched Wednesday by the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (NCOSH), is a coalition effort to put a halt to sexual abuse and harassment with a specific focus on the experiences of low-wage and otherwise vulnerable workers. 

Mika Doyle: More Low-Wage Workers Join the #MeToo Movement Through the "Our Turn" Campaign -- 6/28/18

The latest to come from the movement is a new collaborative effort to protect janitors, factory workers, farm workers and other low-wage workers who’ve joined with safety, labor and anti-violence women’s rights advocates to announce the launch of “Our Turn,” a new alliance coordinated by the National Council for Occupational Safety and health to end the sexual abuse and harassment of low-wage and other vulnerable workers.

WorkersCompensation.com: #MeToo Moves to the Workplace -- 6/27/18

The Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (MassCOSH) joined a new alliance with janitors, factory workers, farmworkers and other low-wage workers to launch of “Our Turn,” a new alliance to put a halt to sexual abuse and harassment, with a special focus on low-wage and vulnerable workers...“Low-wage workers are fed up are saying loud and clear, ‘We will not tolerate abuse as a condition of earning a living,'” said National COSH co-executive director Jessica Martinez. “This is a basic issue of workplace safety. Every worker – regardless of race, gender, income or sexual orientation – has a fundamental right to a workplace free from abuse and harassment.”

Oxfam: Our Turn: Taking back the workplace to end sexual harassment and abuse -- 6/26/18

The #OurTurn declaration was created through a collaborative process that took place at an assembly of the Sexual Harassment Action Network, convened by the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (NCOSH), with participation of many workers’ centers, labor unions, and national advocacy groups such as A Better Balance, National Women’s Law Center, Futures Without Violence, and others...

Truthout: Workplace Deaths Are Rising. Trump-Era Budget Cuts Could Make It Worse -- 6/22/18

Workplace safety systems are “definitely in the failure mode,” says Peter Dooley, a consultant with the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health who was worked closely with labor unions over the years. “In the last two years it is getting dramatically worse. It’s just outrageous."

MassLive: Massachusetts Senate passes wage theft bill -- 6/21/18

Al Vega, director of policy and programs at the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health, said sometimes, for example, a general contractor will delay paying a subcontractor, so the subcontractor will not pay its workers.

EHS Daily Advisor: A Few Top Companies Are on the ‘Dirty Dozen’ List of Unsafe Employers -- 6/19/18

When we think of companies like Amazon and Tesla, we think of technologically innovative organizations on the cutting edge of their industries. When we add in home improvement behemoth Lowe’s, we still see a group of extremely prominent and well-respected companies with vast resources at their disposal. That’s why it’s so surprising to see these three big names on the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health’s (National COSH) list of “The Dirty Dozen” employers of 2018.

In These Times: Workplace Deaths Are Rising. Trump-Era Budget Cuts Could Make It Worse -- 6/18/18

The National Council’s answer to this problem is to publish its own “Dirty Dozen” list of employers notable for health and safety problems among their workforces.

Gizmodo: Elon Musk Allegedly Tells Tesla Staff to Remain 'Extremely Vigilant' Amid 'Sabotage,' Factory Fire -- 6/18/18

Earlier this year, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health named Tesla one of the most dangerous workplaces in the US, following another investigation by Reveal that claimed the company was systemically under-reporting the number of injuries at the Fremont facility and cutting corners on safety to maximize staff time spent on production.

NELP: America's Nonstandard Workforce Faces Wage, Benefit Penalties, According to U.S. Data -- 6/7/18

Health and safety is another area where employers offload traditional responsibilities by using temp workers. Temp workers are much more likely to be injured than permanent workers because of inadequate training and supervision, and often get more dangerous work assignments than permanent employees,” said Douglas Parker, executive director of Worksafe. “Once injured, a temp worker usually lacks the benefits and job security of a permanent worker, increasing the likelihood of a serious injury leading to financial calamity for the worker’s family.”

Alphr: Amazon UK to create 2,500 jobs across the country over the next six months -- 6/6/18

In a press release, Amazon said it had invested more than £9.3 billion in its UK operations since 2010 and, once all these vacancies are filled, it will have more than 6,500 corporate, research and development and AWS roles in the UK by the end of 2018. The move comes amid ongoing claims of poor working conditions at Amazon centres in the US. These claims have reached such a fever pitch that Amazon was recently named one of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health’s (NCOSH) "most dangerous places to work."

Chelsea Now: West Chelsea Site ‘Flagged’ for Non-Union Work, Unsafe Conditions -- 6/6/18

“Flaggers serve a very import role, but not just for the public,” according to Charlene Obernauer, executive director of the nonprofit New York Committee for Occupational Safety & Health (NYCOSH).“Struck-bys are one of the leading causes of fatalities on construction sites,” she said, noting, “Flaggers are essential to keep workers from getting killed.”...Also, Obernauer quoted the following statistic that backs up the claim that union sites are safer: 93.8 percent of construction fatalities that occurred in New York City were on non-union jobs, according to the most recent Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) report, covering the year of 2016.

May 2018

The Epoch Times: Senior FBI Agent Dies From 9/11-Related Illness -- 5/29/18

Lee Clarke, who is the Chairperson for the New York Committee for Occupational Safety & Health (NYCOSH), said in 2017 that more than 5,700 survivors currently have cancer, The Hill reported.

EHS Today: What’s the Real Cost of a Worker’s Life? -- 5/29/18

Tesla, in fact, is one of the companies tagged on the annual “Dirty Dozen” list of safety offenders compiled by the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH).

FairWarning: A deadly explosion and a CEO bonus -- 5/29/18

Still, Patterson CEO Andy Hendricks received a $2.25 million bonus for 2017, bringing his total compensation to more than $14 million, according to Energywire. This month, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, a coalition of unions and other nonprofits, put Patterson on its list of “The Dirty Dozen” companies who put workers at risk.

Hazards magazine/ITUC: USA: Workers’ Memorial Week – Love, support and standing up for safety – report and pictures -- 5/22/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) federation reported events from all over the U.S. and around the globe, 2018 was another amazing Workers’ Memorial Week.

The Daily Yonder: Firestarter Magaly Licolli on Fighting for Immigrant Workers -- 5/22/18

“If you ask poultry workers for their demands, they will say they want to be treated as human beings,” said Magaly Licolli, executive director of the Northwest Arkansas Workers Justice Center, which works on labor issues with the immigrant community.

My Central Jersey: Workers Memorial Day connects with impact of climate change -- 5/21/18

"Climate change is already a public health emergency, and the impacts on workers and communities are only going to get worse," said Dan Fatton, executive director of the New Jersey Work Environment Council.

WorkersCompensation.comWorker Killed by Common Workplace Hazard -- 5/18/18

The death of Anthony Lyon who suffered fatal injuries May 1 after being struck by a piece of equipment at ITW Devcon in Danvers, MA is a tragic reminder that employers should ensure that no employee is required to work directly below a suspended load so that catastrophic events like this no longer take place, said the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety & Health (MassCOSH) in a statement released today.

WorkersCompensation.comNational Employment Law Project’s Debbie Berkowitz to Accept Organization’s Award at 2018 NYCOSH Gala -- 5/17/18

National Employment Law Project (NELP) is being honored at NYCOSH's 2018 Gala for its tremendous contributions to the workers' rights movement, but in particular, for their advocacy and research in relation to occupational safety and health....NYCOSH Executive Director Charlene Obernauer interviewed Ms. Berkowitz to showcase her work and NELP's leadership in the movement.

WCVB-TV: Fatal work injuries in metro Boston at highest level since 2000 -- 5/14/18

According to MassCOSH, there are 29 OSHA inspectors, or roughly one for every 115,863 workers in Massachusetts, and "it would take 182 years for OSHA to pay a single visit to each workplace in the state."

Wicked Local: Fatal work injuries in metro Boston at highest level since 2000 -- 5/14/18

In April, the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health highlighted the growing number of workers killed on the job, and noted the new data includes deaths due to opioid use related to work. According to MassCOSH, “these workers, when injured, feel pressure to return to work before they are ready and to work in pain, a situation that can easily lead to addiction to dangerous painkillers, and as we are increasingly seeing, overdoes and death.”

MarketWatch: A science lesson for Elon Musk: It pays to work less -- 5/12/18

A report released in April from National Council for Occupational Safety and Health noted “that Tesla’s Fremont, Calif., plant had a rate of serious injuries that was 83% higher than the industry average in 2016.”

Times Union: Letter: New York scaffold law promotes onsite safety -- 5/5/18

Letter from Charlene Obernauer, Executive Director, New York Committee for Occupational Safety & Health

Supply and Demand Chain Executive: National COSH Announces "Dirty Dozen" Employers -- 5/4/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) announced the "Dirty Dozen" employers of 2018 in observance of Workers' Memorial Week, honoring those who have lost their lives on the job.

WorkersCompensation.com: Workers Memorial Day 2018 -- 5/3/18

You can see a number of these yourself, and learn more about the workers who perished, by looking at the WORKSAFE report “Dying at Work in California”...

EHS Today: The 12 Most Dangerous Companies of 2018 -- 5/3/18

Every year the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) compiles a list—a blacklist, if you will—of the companies that are the most egregious at putting their employees in harm's way, due to unsafe practices.

Lifehacker: Does Amazon Australia Still Suck? -- 5/2/18

On top of that, the US based National Council for Occupational Safety and Health announced last week that they'd put Amazon on their list of the most dangerous places to work.

The Chief: Unions Honor the Dead, Take Added Steps to Improve On-the-Job Safety -- 5/2/18

The annual service, sponsored by the AFL-CIO New York City Central Labor Council and the New York Committee for Occupational Health, is meant to honor the dead but also to recommit to improving workplace and occupational safety.

Plant Services: Report: Amazon and Tesla facilities among the most dangerous workplaces in America -- 5/1/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) has released a report singling out 12 companies that most put their workers at risk, and Amazon and Tesla both made the list.

Newsclick.in: Amazon, Tesla Among Most Dangerous Places For Workers In US, Says Report -- 5/3/18

Amazon and Tesla are among the most dangerous workplaces in the United States, says a 2018 annual report by the National Council for Occupational Health and Safety (COSH) .

eComplianceReport: Tesla, Amazon and Lowe’s Among the Most Dangerous Employers -- 5/1/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) recently released, “The Dirty Dozen” employers of 2018. This dubious list reveals the 12 least safe companies to work for, based on their relative number of workplace injuries or reported harassment incidents.

brand-e: The dangers of Amazon, Tesla -- 5/1/18

Amazon and Tesla are among the top 12 most-dangerous places to work in the US, according to the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health.

MassLive.com: Worker deaths hit 11-year high in 2017 in Massachusetts -- 5/1/18

Worker deaths are at an 11-year high in Massachusetts, according to a new report by the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health.

April 2018

The Post and CourierFamily wants paint stripper banned -- 4/30/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health recently named Lowe's to its list of the "Dirty Dozen." The list highlights "companies that put workers and communities at risk due to unsafe practices," according to a press release.

Investopedia: Amazon, Tesla Among the Most Dangerous for Workers -- 4/30/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health’s Dirty Dozen list is out, which gauges safety and danger in factories and warehouses around the country.

Now This: Amazon and Tesla Among Most Dangerous Workplaces -- 4/30/18

Amazon and Tesla are among the most dangerous workplaces in the U.S., according to the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH), that released a “Dirty Dozen” list and ranked companies based on working conditions.

Workers Compensation.com: Dangerous Jobs Killed 74 Workers in Massachusetts -- 4/30/18

Today, the Massachusetts AFL-CIO and the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (MassCOSH) released a new report documenting the loss of life taking place at worksites across Massachusetts. Titled Dying for Work in Massachusetts: The Loss of Life and Limb in Massachusetts Workplaces, the 32-page report details how workers like Wright-Davis lost their lives on the job and what must be done to keep workers safe.

Geek.com: Amazon and Tesla Have Some of the Most Dangerous Facilities in the US -- 4/28/18

While tech giants may once have been the golden bois of the modern world, they’ve definitely been pretty bad of late...Amazon and Tesla are apparently death cults. By which, of course, I mean it’s apparently really dangerous to work there. Like… really bad. In a new report from the advocacy group the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, has listed both of the companies on their “Dirty Dozen,” a list of the most dangerous places to work in the US.

Business Insider: Seven people have died on the job in Amazon's warehouses since 2013 — here's what happened -- 4/28/18

"This year, we'll identify several companies who received specific warnings about safety hazards and failed to correct them. Workers paid the ultimate price for these failures," Marcy Goldstein-Gelb, co-executive director of National COSH, said in a statement.

WCVB 5: Families look to put a stop to workplace deaths -- 4/28/18

So many of the faces on display at the State House Friday have been sad news stories. The MassCOSH event looks to put a stop to it.

My Central Jersey: Rally marks Workers' Memorial Day -- 4/28/18

The event, organized by New Labor, the New Jersey Work Environment Council and other partners in the Jersey Renews coalition, brought together a diverse group of workers, immigrants, environmentalists and health professionals to march and rally for climate and worker justice.

NY1 Noticias: Ceremonia para recordar a trabajadores muertos en su sitio de trabajo -- 4/27/18

"Implementar más leyes que les de más responsabilidad a esos contratistas hacia esos trabajadores", explicó Charlie Uruchina de NYCOSH.

Associated Press: Mortalidad laboral amenaza a latinos en EEUU, dice central -- 4/27/18

Una organización sin fines de lucro llamada Consejo Nacional de Salud y Seguridad Ocupacional lanzó un informe similar al de AFL-CIO e incluyó una sección que reseña denuncias de irregularidades en 12 empresas estadounidenses específicas.

Business RecorderAmazon clarifies steps being taken for safety of its workers -- 4/27/18

The advocacy group ‘National Council for Occupational Safety and Health’ (COSH) released ‘The Dirty Dozen 2018’ list where Amazon and Tesla were ranked as two of the most dangerous places to work based on factory and warehouse conditions.

Newsday: LIRR freight provider a dangerous employer, safety group says -- 4/27/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, an advocacy group, included the New York and Atlantic Railroad, or NYAR, in its “Dirty Dozen” list of companies that put workers and communities at risk...“There’s very compelling testimony from these workers about the conditions they faced,” said council spokesman Roger Kerson. “We thought it was something worth highlighting.”

Alpr: Amazon and Tesla “most dangerous places to work in the US,” according to the Dirty Dozen list -- 4/27/18

...it’s probably no surprise to find that Amazon has earned a spot on the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health’s (NCOSH) ‘Dirty Dozen’ list, joining Tesla as, what the report calls, “one of the most dangerous places to work in the US.”

MassLive.com: Rising worker deaths create a disturbing trend (Editorial) --4/27/18

A report by the Massachusetts Coalition of Occupational Safety and Health (MassCOSH) listed 21 construction-related deaths, making building the largest category for fatalities. Another eight worked in retail, which included food delivery.

Dirt Diggers: Workplace Hazards in the Tech Economy -- 4/26/18

Tesla makes the Dirty Dozen list because National COSH found that its injury rate was 31 percent higher than the rest of the automotive industry and its rate of serious injuries was 83 percent higher.

Business Recorder: Tesla, Amazon listed as one of most dangerous workplaces -- 4/26/18

The advocacy group ‘National Council for Occupational Safety and Health’ released a ‘The Dirty Dozen 2018’ list that contains Tesla as one of the most dangerous places to work in the US, based on its factory and warehouse conditions.

The Progressive Pulse: Two NC firms, Amazon among nation’s 12 worst companies for worker safety in latest rankings -- 4/26/18

This is Workers’ Memorial Week — a time for remembering the American workers who lost their lives on the job during the past year. In recognition of this fact, the good people at the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health have released a new and important report that shines a light on some of the worst corporate offenders when it comes to worker safety.

NH Labor News: Workplace Deaths On The Rise: National Worker Safety Group Release “Dirty Dozen” Employers -- 4/26/18

“It’s heartbreaking to see workers lose their lives when we know these tragedies could have been prevented,” said Marcy Goldstein-Gelb, co-executive director of National COSH. “Time and again, employers are warned about unsafe conditions. When companies fail to correct safety hazards, it is workers who pay the ultimate price.”

Hoy Los Angeles: Revelan las 12 compañías de empleo 'más sucias' contra los inmigrantes y latinos -- 4/26/18

En observancia a la semana de conmemoración de los trabajadores caídos, el Consejo Nacional de Salud y Seguridad Ocupacional (COSH Nacional) presentó este jueves el informe de la "La Docena Sucia" de empleadores de 2018, el cual revela las 12 compañías que han abusado de este sector.

Hoy San Diego: Los trabajadores hispanos están expuestos a más riesgos que la media nacional -- 4/26/18

Uno de los trabajadores que ha denunciado malas condiciones y discriminación en su compañía, el mexicano Miguel Ángel Ramos, de 34 años, criticó en otra llamada organizada por el Consejo Nacional de Seguridad y Salud Ocupacional (COSH, por sus siglas en inglés) que la empresa en la que trabajaba no le entrenó para las peligrosas tareas que tenía que realizar.

Entrepreneur: Amazon and Tesla Listed Among the Most Dangerous U.S. Workplaces -- 4/26/18

Amazon and Tesla are usually proud of appearing on lists, but not this time around. The advocacy group National Council for Occupational Safety and Health has placed both companies on a "Dirty Dozen" list of the most dangerous places to work in the U.S. based on their factory and warehouse conditions.

Buzzfeed News: Amazon Is Raising Its Annual Prime Fee From $99 To $119 -- 4/26/18

Amazon was also recently listed in the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health's list of 12 companies that "put communities and workers at risk."

Data News: Amazon et Tesla sur la liste des douze lieux de travail les plus dangereux aux Etats-Unis -- 4/26/18

Le 'National Council for Occupational Safety and Health' (COSH) américain a dressé une liste des douze lieux de travail les plus dangereux des Etats-Unis, qu'il appelle 'Dirty Dozen'.

Inside OSHA Online: Safety Groups Seek OSHA Funding Boost In Face Of Increased Worker Deaths -- 4/26/18

A coalition of local safety and health groups say that an uptick in worker deaths in 2016 should prompt the Trump administration to boost OSHA funding for inspections, arguing that increased resources for workplace safety and health programs and more robust agency follow-up enforcement would help prevent worker deaths. The coalition, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (NCOSH), in an April 25 report , “The Dirty Dozen: Employers Who Put Workers & Communities at Risk,” lists companies...

Industrial Safety and Hygiene News (ISHN): Amazon, Tesla named to most unsafe employers list -- 4/26/18

The top online retailer in the world is also tops at being an unsafe employer, according to the “Dirty Dozen” list released yesterday by the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH)..National COSH pointed out that the 5,190 workplace deaths from acute trauma in 2016 comprise the highest total recorded since 2008.

i4U News: Amazon And Tesla Named Among The Most Dangerous Workplaces In The US -- 4/26/18

A report came out recently regarding the top twelve workplaces that were dangerous for employees in the US...Termed the Dirty Dozen 2018, the report got its information from efforts made by health and safety activists.

HYPEBEAST: Amazon and Tesla Named Among Most Dangerous Workplaces in U.S. -- 4/26/18

Amazon and Tesla have appeared on an undesirable list, being named among the most unsafe places to work in the United States. The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health put both companies on a “dirty dozen” list that ranks companies by their factory conditions.

Times Now: Amazon, Tesla in the list of most dangerous places to work: Report -- 4/26/18

Both Tesla and Amazon have been listed on the 'Dirty Dozen' based on their warehouse and factory conditions. Owing to higher-than-average injury rates, unnecessary risks and an unwillingness to listen to workers' concerns, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health has brought up the companies.

The Boston Globe: Worker deaths continue to rise in Mass. -- 4/26/18

Wright Davis is among a growing legion of independent contractors and temp workers with few if any employment protections, and one of at least two such workers killed on the job in Massachusetts last year, according to a report released Thursday by the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health, known as MassCOSH.

Boston Business Journal: Massachusetts worker deaths hit 11-year high, says report -- 4/26/18

Massachusetts deaths on the job reached an 11-year high in 2017, an increase attributable to the commonwealth’s many construction projects, as well as an increased prevalence of opioid addiction, according to a newly released report by the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health...

Manchester Ink Link: April 28 is Workers Memorial Day -- 4/26/18

The New Hampshire Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (NHCOSH) has been able to identify 11 NH workers killed on the job last year...

Tulsa World: Drilling company in Quinton gas rig explosion named to 'Dirty Dozen' list for workplace safety by national advocate group -- 4/25/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health on Wednesday released its “Dirty Dozen” for 2018. The report cites a five-year increase in workplace deaths (5,190 in 2016), climbing 12 percent since 2012. In that same time frame, the budget for OSHA has dipped by $12 million...The Dirty Dozen list this year includes Houston-based Patterson UTI, which was drilling a natural gas well near Quinton that ignited and exploded Jan. 22.

Gizmodo: Amazon and Tesla Facilities Named Among the Most Dangerous Workplaces in America -- 4/25/18

On Wednesday, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) released a report singling out 12 companies that most put their workers at risk, and Amazon and Tesla both made the list.“Every day there are workers who don’t come home to their families because of tragedies we know could have been prevented,” Marcy Goldstein-Gelb, co-executive director of National COSH, said in a statement.

BGR: Report claims Amazon and Tesla are some of the more dangerous places to work -- 4/25/18

According to a new report from the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH), Amazon and Tesla share the not so illustrious honor of having factories with less than ideal working conditions for employees.

Engadget: Amazon and Tesla listed among the most dangerous US workplaces -- 4/25/18

Amazon and Tesla are usually proud of appearing on lists, but not this time around. The advocacy group National Council for Occupational Safety and Health has placed both companies on a "Dirty Dozen" list of the most dangerous places to work in the US based on their factory and warehouse conditions.

News9: Drilling Company Makes 'Dirty Dozen' List After Rig Explosion, Worker Deaths -- 4/25/18

The drilling company behind January’s deadly gas rig explosion makes the 'Dirty Dozen' list of the top unsafe workplaces in America. The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health included Patterson UTI on its "Dirty Dozen" list after 5 workers died on the rig in Quinton.

Pump Handle: Tesla, Lowe's Named in "Dirty Dozen" report on unsafe workplaces --4/25/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health is marking International Worker Memorial Day with the release of its report, “The Dirty Dozen 2018: Employers Who Put Workers and Communities at Risk.”

Tecmundo: Tesla e Amazon entre os lugares mais perigosos para se trabalhar nos EUA -- 4/25/18

O conselho, conhecido nos EUA como "National COSH", criticou o ritmo de trabalho que a Amazon impõe a seus funcionários, bem como a supervisão constante e as metas ambiciosas.

Tulsa World: Drilling company in Quinton gas rig explosion named to 'Dirty Dozen' list for workplace safety by national advocate group -- 4/25/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health on Wednesday released its “Dirty Dozen” for 2018...The Dirty Dozen list this year includes Houston-based Patterson UTI, which was drilling a natural gas well near Quinton that ignited and exploded Jan. 22.

WCBD News 2Lowe's added to national 'Dirty Dozen' list following Charleston man's death -- 4/25/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) announced today “The Dirty Dozen” employers of 2018, highlighting companies that put workers and communities at risk due to unsafe practices.

Manchester Ink LinkFallen NH workers commemorated amid calls for worker safety -- 4/25/18

The lives of 11 New Hampshire workers killed on the job in 2017 were commemorated April 24 in Hooksett during the annual NH Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (NHCOSH) Memorial Dinner at the Plumbers and Pipefitters Hall.

News On 6: Drilling Company Makes 'Dirty Dozen' List After Rig Explosion, Worker Deaths -- 4/25/18

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health included Patterson UTI on its "Dirty Dozen" list after 5 workers died on the rig in Quinton.

NH Labor NewsNH COSH: Every Worker Has The Right To Go Home Safely At The End Of Their Shift -- 4/25/18

The New Hampshire Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (NHCOSH) has been able to identify 11 NH workers killed on the job last year. Several of these workers would be alive today had their employers followed the law and provided proper safety training and equipment.

Teen Vogue: Domestic Workers Are Women of Color and Immigrants Who Deserve More Respect -- 4/23/18

Their legacy is carried on by a new generation of black and brown women-led labor organizations such as La Colectiva de Mujeres, Fe y Justicia Worker Center, Miami Workers Center, and the National Domestic Workers Alliance who continue to fight for federal protections and equal compensation.

NH Labor NewsNH COSH Hosts Annual ‘Workers Memorial Day’ Vigil On Tuesday April 24th -- 4/20/18

The NH Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health is sponsoring two events during Workers’ Memorial Week to commemorate the tragic deaths of 11 NH workers who were killed on the job in 2017. On Tuesday, April 24th at 5:30pm, NHCOSH will host a Memorial Dinner at the Plumbers and Pipefitters Hall in Hooksett. In attendance will be families of fallen workers, local and state officials, labor leaders and others leading the movement to end unsafe work conditions. On Thursday, April 26th at noon NHCOSH is hosting a vigil at City Plaza in Concord to honor the 11 NH workers and to call for policies that recognize that all workers are valuable and important to commerce, the economy and civic life.

NJ SpotlightTrump Administration Opens New Offshore Wind Leases -- 4/9/18

Offshore wind farms could create up to 75,000 clean energy jobs in New Jersey and other coastal states, according to a report issued last week from the Center for American Progress and the New Jersey Work Environment Council.

Manhattan District Attorney's OfficeDA Vance: Construction Company, Principals Plead Guilty to Stealing Workers’ Wages -- 4/5/18

Last year, District Attorney Vance invested $1.6 million in a new program administered by the New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (NYCOSH) to end the disproportionate number of immigrant workers who become victims of workplace crimes committed by their employers, including wage theft; provide victims with referrals and access to support services; and increase the reporting of criminal activities by employers.

Daily Energy InsiderOffshore wind farm could create 75,000 jobs, report finds -- 4/4/18

A new report from the Center for American Progress (CAP) and the New Jersey Work Environment Council (WEC) says that new offshore wind farms in coastal states could create more than 75,000 jobs...“This report underscores a major opportunity to not only put people to work installing those turbines, but also to create a regional supply chain that will provide family-sustaining jobs in the manufacturing and distribution industries,” WEC Executive Director Dan Fatton said.

New Jersey Education AssociationWorkers’ Memorial Day: A Time for Action -- 4/1/18

On Sunday, April 22, Earth Day, the New Jersey Work Environment Council (WEC), New Labor and more than twenty endorsing organizations, including NJEA, are holding a Workers’ Memorial Day rally and march in New Brunswick. NJEA President Marie Blistan is slated to speak. The event begins with a rally at 1 p.m. in Anshe Emeth Memorial Temple, followed by a march through the streets of New Brunswick.

March 2018

Northwest Arkansas Democrat GazetteSimmons bond issue plan draws mixed views in Benton County -- 3/28/18

Fernando Garcia of Fayetteville, an organizer for the Northwest Arkansas Workers' Justice Center, told the justices of the peace he's concerned about the working conditions for Simmons employees. He likened some poultry plant employment to 'modern-day slavery conditions.' "We do need jobs, but we need jobs with dignity and respect," he said.

BBC NewsObituary: The 9/11 rescuers who died a day apart, 17 years on -- 3/25/18

New York's Committee for Occupational Safety & Health says that about 6,000 of the 9/11 first responders are now living with cancer, with thousands more suffering breathing problems or mental health issues.

WBJournal.com: Baker signs OSHA bill for public workers -- 3/14/18

Massachusetts Coalition For Occupational Safety And Health (MassCOSH) Executive Director Jodi Sugerman-Brozan has called the bill "a historic victory for workers in the state." After the bill was sent to Baker's desk on March 1, Sugarman-Brozan said, "Over the coming years, untold number of lives will be saved because OSHA protections will now cover thousands more workers."

MassLiveGov. Charlie Baker signs bill extending OSHA safety standards to municipal workers -- 3/10/18

Approximately 400,000 workers will be covered by the extension, according to MassCOSH, the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health...MassCOSH Executive Director Jodi Sugerman-Brozan, in a statement, called the passage of the bill "historic" and said lives will be saved by the improved safety standards.

Safety + HealthMassachusetts House passes bill to extend OSHA protections to public workers -- 3/7/18

...the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health posted a piece on its website lauding the progression of the legislation, which it called “a huge boost to the health and safety of municipal workers in Massachusetts.”

Society for Human Resource Management: California Strengthens Wage-Theft Laws --3/7/18

"For every wage-theft case that is reported, there are dozens more that don't get reported," said Jora Trang, managing attorney at Worksafe Inc., an employee advocacy group based in Oakland. "That's because of retaliation. If workers know when they report wage theft they're going to get fired, they're less likely to report it."

NJ.com: Murphy is in driver's seat to make N.J. electric-car friendly | Opinion -- 3/7/18

WHYY: A crash course in workplace sexual harassment is putting #MeToo on the menu in Philly -- 3/7/18

While sexual harassment can occur anywhere, more workers in the restaurant industry file sexual harassment claims than in any other field, according to a decade of data from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). One group in Philadelphia is trying to change that. “We hope to really get our message out to everyone in the restaurant workforce about their rights, so that it’s not just a matter of justice for people who happen to work for a newsworthy harasser,” said Nadia Hewka, an attorney with Community Legal Services of Philadelphia and one of the founders of the Coalition for Restaurant Safety and Health (CRSH).

Other members include PHILAPOSH, the Restaurant Opportunity Center (ROC) of Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations, and Women Organized Against Rape.

Philanthropy Journal News: Keeping Workers Safe, On and Off the Job -- 3/5/18

Worksafe is an advocacy organization that is part of the California legal aid system, dedicated to the belief that everyone has the right to work in a safe and healthy workplace. Worksafe grew out of the union of two COSH (Committee on Occupational Safety and Health) groups in the Bay Area of San Francisco, with roots going back to the late 1970s. These groups were initially formed to address a gap in worker advocacy around occupational safety and health.

February 2018

Tapinto.net: Bloomfield Mayor Venezia Joins Mayors of other Earned Sick Day Towns to Call for Statewide Action -- 2/26/18

"Ensuring that all workers in New Jersey have access to earned sick days is a common sense policy to guarantee working families have options when a breadwinner needs time to recover from an illness or injury; allowing workers time off to recover while sick also protects the rest of us by keeping germs out of the workplace," said Dan Fatton, executive director for New Jersey Work Environment Council.

The Berkshire Eagle: Letter: Standing up for unions, and workplace safety -- 2/23/18

For eight years, serving as the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health's communication director, I have shared the struggles of low-wage workers and the gantlet of health and safety issues they face. Isolated and desperate, these workers expose themselves daily to chemical hazards, lead, dangerous machines without training, deadly heights, and so much more. In 2016, 70 workers needlessly died on the job in the Bay State in an attempt to make a living.

KNWA-TV: Labor Rights Activist Kicks-Off Women's History Month at the UofA -- 2/22/18

The University of Arkansas and the Northwest Arkansas Workers' Justice Center have partnered up to bring the movie, Dolores, to the community.

Times Union: Scaffold Law helps keep construction sites safe -- 2/17/18

New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health recently published findings on worksite safety based on the most-recent full year of available data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the New York City Department of Buildings.

EHSToday: EHS Leaders Look Ahead to 2018 and Beyond -- 2/15/18

Safety + Health: Rising construction worker deaths in New York a ‘crisis,’ executive director of NYCOSH says -- 2/13/18

Construction worker fatalities continue to rise in New York state amid rampant safety violations, according to an annual report released by the New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health, an advocacy group... "We need to take action now to end the crisis of rising construction fatalities in New York state,” NYCOSH Executive Director Charlene Obernauer said in a Jan. 31 press release. “These deaths are almost always preventable and could be deterred by passing sensible legislation in New York state and by protecting existing legislation, such as the Scaffold Safety Law, that protects workers.”

NJ.com: Activists call for more electric public transportation -- 2/7/18

Dan Fatton, executive director of the New Jersey Work Environment Council, said he wants the state to invest now in electric transportation to avoid higher costs in the future. "We're calling on the state to do more," Fatton said. "We want more electric vehicle charging, we want more electric buses, we want to address our climate crisis on a local level, because the cost of inaction is too high."

Seattlepi.com: Activists rally in Jersey City for electric public transit -- 2/6/18

Dan Fatton, executive director of the New Jersey Work Environment Council, says he wants the state to invest now in electric transportation to avoid higher costs in the future.

January 2018

CBS New York: Report: New York Construction Fatalities Going Up -- 1/31/18

The study, put out by the union-backed New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health, found that 71 workers died in construction-related accidents in 2016, the last year for which full data was available. That’s up from 55 deaths in 2015 and the highest number of fatalities since 2002.

U.S. News & World Report: Report Says NY Construction Fatalities Going Up -- 1/31/18

The study, put out by the union-backed New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health and first reported by The Associated Press, found that 71 workers died in construction-related accidents in 2016, the last year for which full data was available. That's up from 55 deaths in 2015 and the highest number of fatalities since 2002...The report's author, Charlene Obernauer, said funding cuts have hurt the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration's ability to protect workers and led to a sharp reduction in the number of site inspections. She said the state must step in to fill the vacuum. "I certainly wasn't anticipating this level of a jump in New York state," Obernauer said. "New York City has taken on the challenge and we believe New York state has to look at the same solutions."

Star Gazette: NY construction fatalities rise, report says -- 1/31/18

Daily Messenger: Report: NY construction fatalities going up -- 1/31/18

WorkersCompensation: NYCOSH Construction Fatality Report, “Deadly Skyline,” Released Today, Reveals Alarming Increases in New York State Construction Fatalities --1/31/18

Wellsville Regional News: Report: Alarming Increases in New York State Construction Fatalities -- 1/31/18

The New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (NYCOSH) released its latest construction fatality report, “Deadly Skyline: An Annual Report on Construction Fatalities in New York State.” Researchers found alarming increases in New York State construction fatalities and that employers routinely violate legal regulations with impunity... “We need to take action now to end the crisis of rising construction fatalities in New York State. These deaths are almost always preventable and could be deterred by passing sensible legislation in New York State and by protecting existing legislation, such as the Scaffold Safety Law, that protects workers,” said Charlene Obernauer, Executive Director of NYCOSH

ArkansasOnline: Permits' end alarms Salvadorans -- 1/27/18

In a recent interview with the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Fernando Garcia, of the Northwest Arkansas Workers' Justice Center, translated for Jose and Evelyn Castro. The Castro family has lived in three states since they fled El Salvador, and now they claim Springdale as their home. Their five children were born here. And if Jose and Evelyn can't find another way to stay in the U.S., separation from their children may become a reality, they said.

Food Safety News: Letter to the Editor: USDA should rethink pork line speed plan -- 1/27/18

Safety + Health: Groups oppose USDA proposal to eliminate line-speed limits in pork-processing plants -- 1/25/18

A U.S. Department of Agriculture proposal to remove maximum line speeds in pork-processing plants “will translate into even more illness and injury” among workers, according to the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health... “Workers who bring food to our tables deserve safety and dignity on the job, and consumers deserve and demand safe food,” Jessica Martinez, National COSH co-executive director, said in the release. “Raising line speeds in pork-processing plants will only make a bad situation worse.”

NH Labor News: Safety Groups Team Up to Protect Workers During Ongoing Disaster Cleanup in Puerto Rico -- 1/26/18

With reconstruction efforts still underway, the International Chemical Workers Union Council (ICWUC) and the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) have brought together a team of senior trainers and worker educators this week at the Universidad de Puerto Rico to boost local skills and help protect workers on the island from preventable illnesses, injuries and possible fatalities...“Millions of people in Puerto Rico are still suffering from the damage caused by Hurricane Maria,” said Jessica Martinez, co-executive director of National COSH, who helped coordinate the training. “That’s why it’s so important that experienced trainers from the COSH Network are on the ground to provide help where it’s needed the most.”

Tusa WorldDrilling contractor in Quinton explosion had OSHA violations in past -- 1/23/18

A workplace safety expert with the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, Peter Dooley, said work in the oilfield is inherently dangerous. “The thing that investigators need to be really looking is if there any sort of foreshadowing events ... that indicated possible problems and how they were responded to,” he said. “That’s going to be the most informative information.”

In These Times: Houston Is Being Rebuilt on a Foundation of Wage Theft -- 1/22/18

“All the contamination that came [in with storm water] stays in the drywall, stays in the carpet, and people are taking all of that out and carrying that and getting sick,” says Marianela Acuña Arreaza, executive director of the Houston-based Fe y Justicia Worker Center... Since Harvey, Fe y Justicia has also trained about 200 people in how to use protective equipment, what symptoms of exposure look like, and how to protect people from hazards like mold.

Organic Authority USDA Proposes Lifting Meat Processing Line Speed Caps in Pork Plants -- 1/22/18

“Workers who bring food to our tables deserve safety and dignity on the job, and consumers deserve and demand safe food,” said Jessica Martinez, co-executive director of National Council for Occupational Safety and Health. “Raising line speeds in pork processing plants will only make a bad situation worse.”

Oxfam: The fear behind that cheap chicken -- 1/17/28

At a recent gathering of the National Council on Occupational Safety and Health, factory workers from numerous industries, union stewards, worker center employees, lawyers, and staff from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) all agreed that fear was the single most significant barrier that kept workers from reporting their injuries. 

WHDH TV 7NEWSSecond Massachusetts worker dies while clearing snow -- 1/10/18

“This is very sad news for both families,” said Jodi Sugerman-Brozan, Executive Director of MassCOSH. “All employers should have conversations with employees involved in snow removal to take frequent breaks to avoid overtaxing their bodies given how related this work and heart failure are.”

Portside: Worker Safety Experts: Court Ruling on Silica Dust Limits is a “Huge Victory” -- 1/6/18

“This is a huge win for millions of workers in construction, foundries, mining, shipbuilding, and many other industries. Low-wage workers and those in the informal sector can now be assured of safer working conditions,” said Jessica Martinez, co-executive director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (NCOSH)...Martinez said that the court ruling presents a clear path forward. “Now that industry’s challenge to this sensible, life-saving rule has failed, OSHA must focus on rigorous enforcement,” Martinez said.

Dorchester Reporter: Meaningful wage theft laws needed to protect workers --1/3/18

The Massachusetts Legislature needs to finally pass a wage theft bill (H.1033 / S.999) to protect Massachusetts workers and their ability to support their families. Since 2009 I have worked with the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (MassCOSH): a nonprofit organization based in Fields Corner that strives to ensure that all workers earn their living and return home alive and well. I have seen first-hand how wage theft impacts those who can afford this mistreatment the least.

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