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COSH Network in the News

November 2017

The Progressive Populist:  Amazon, Taxpayer Subsidies and Worker Safety -- 11/17/17

Marcy Goldstein-Gelb is the co-executive director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, which links the efforts of local worker health and safety coalitions in communities nationwide. To this end, the group seeks to end preventable workplace hazards such as those that have killed eight workers in Amazon warehouses since 2013. “One question that has not been asked of Amazon is what kind of jobs it creates in communities,” according to Goldstein-Gelb. This is no academic matter. The company’s use, for example, of temporary employment agencies to staff its warehouses can present safety problems that put at-risk the lives and limbs of workers....Amazon contracting with temporary staffing agencies to staff warehouses absolves the company of responsibility for workers’ safety, Goldstein-Gelb said. NCOSH is active on the federal level to change finger pointing between Amazon and its labor contractors, which leaves workers in the lurch, poorly protected if at all from harm. Precarious labor conditions pave the way for workers’ fatalities and injuries, according to Goldstein-Gelb. To reduce such risk, NCOSH is lobbying for OSHA to look at worker logs to ensure that temporary agencies do not simply fire whistleblowers who attempt to call attention to unsafe labor conditions...To make laboring in Amazon warehouses safer, NCOSH in part supports the self-activity of the rank-and-file groups such as Warehouse Workers for Justice, according to Goldstein-Gelb. On that note, NCOSH is also pushing local and state governments to include safe labor conditions for workers of companies such as Amazon that reap taxpayer subsidies to locate warehouses and other facilities in communities. “Before a city or state finalizes an offer to Amazon,” Goldstein-Gelb said, “it is important to have provisions that improve the quality of the jobs the company offers."

NECN: Worker Safety and the Gig Economy -- 11/16/17

Who will protect the safety of workers in the gig economy? Al Vega, policy director for the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health, responds to the death of 19-year-old food delivery worker Antawani Wright-Davis.

Metro Washington Council AFL-CIO: Join the Fightback for Better Health and Safety on the Job -- 11/15/17

If you and your co-workers are fighting the boss to make your workplace safer (and who isn’t?) here’s an event you don’t want to miss: The National Conference on Worker Safety and Health, Dec. 5-7 at the Maritime Center just outside Baltimore...Sponsored by the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH).

The Intercept: Immigrant Day Laborers Confront a Perfect Storm of Exploitation in Hurricane Harvey Cleanup -- 11/13/17

Meanwhile, Hany Khalil, who heads the Texas Gulf Coast Area Labor Federation of the AFL-CIO, has joined with the director of Houston’s Fe y Justicia Worker Center to urge law enforcement officials to give immigrants the “tools and confidence to report abusive employers” by granting whistleblower protections to those who come forward.

NH Labor News: Jose Valdicieso’s Death Was Preventable With Proper Precautions And Safety Training -- 11/9/17

“Jose’s death is a double tragedy – both for his family and loved ones, and because it was 100% preventable with proper safety precautions and training,” said Susi Nord, co-director of the New Hampshire Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health. “2017 has been a particularly deadly year for construction workers in New Hampshire, with 6 out of 7 work-related fatalities this year occurring in the industry.”

NH1: Man Who Died After Lift Touched Live Power Line Identified as Father of 2 -- 11/9/17

“Jose’s death is a double tragedy – both for his family and loved ones, and because it was 100 percent preventable with proper safety precautions and training,” said Susi Nord, co-director of the N.H. Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health. “2017 has been a particularly deadly year for construction workers in New Hampshire, with six out of seven work-related fatalities this year occurring in the industry.”

EHSToday: OSHA New Recordkeeping Rule: Top 3 Challenges Coming Down the Line -- 11/9/17

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) hailed the rule as an “important step towards transparency” and OSHA is confident it will facilitate better benchmarking.

The Arkansas Traveler: Day of the Dead Celebration Honors Deceased, Oppressed Immigrants -- 11/5/17

Leaders of the Northwest Arkansas Workers’ Justice Center organized their first Día de los Muertos or Day of the Dead march, beginning at Thompson Street and ending with a procession at the Shiloh Square in downtown Springdale...Traditionally, Día de los Muertos celebrations involve vibrant colors, music, food and dancing to honor the dead. This event featured similar elements of tradition but focused on “making people think about how immigrants live in this country,” said Magaly Licolli, director of the Justice Center and 2013 UA graduate...The Justice Center collaborated with The Artist’s Laboratory Theatre in Fayetteville to create a performance that told the story of an immigrant worker who traveled from her native country, worked in a poultry plant in the U.S. and died on the job. “Day of the Dead has become very popular in the U.S.,” Licolli said. “We see more people being aware of this celebration, so we wanted to take this celebration to also raise awareness about the current situation of immigrants.”

Safety + Health: President Trump nominates Scott Mugno to head OSHA -- 11/1/17

Advocacy group National Council for Occupational Safety and Health urged a “rigorous and thorough” review of Mugno’s nomination in an Oct. 30 press release. 

October 1017

NH Labor News: NATIONAL COSH Has Concerns Over New Nominee To Lead OSHA -- 10/31/17

With the nomination of Scott Mugno, a vice president of FedEx, to head the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Congress and the agency must focus on the terrible toll of preventable injuries, illnesses and deaths that take place every year in U.S. workplaces, say leaders of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH). “More than 4,500 workers die on the job every year and millions more are injured or become ill,” said Jessica Martinez, co-executive director of National COSH. “It’s clear that nearly all of these painful events can be prevented by getting workers involved in identifying and preventing safety hazards, stopping retaliation against workers who come forward with safety complaints and rigorous enforcement against employers who ignore our safety laws and put workers at risk.” “Senate review of this nomination must be rigorous and thorough, because so much is at stake for American workers and families,” said National COSH co-executive director Marcy Goldstein-Gelb. “The work of OSHA is about people. It’s about workers’ lives and limbs. It’s about reducing risks and hazards so everyone can go home safely at the end of his or her shift. We look forward to hearing from Mr. Mugno about how he will listen to workers’ concerns, enforce the law, and make our workplaces safer."

NH Labor News: Concerns About Workplace Safety Needs To Be Addressed At Amazon Warehouses -- 10/31/17

“Getting consumer goods dropped right on your doorstep is nice, but who is paying the price?” asked Jessica Martinez, co-executive director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH). “There is a disturbing pattern of preventable deaths at Amazon. Two workers have been crushed to death by forklifts, one dragged into a conveyor belt, another crushed by a pallet loader and one run over by a truck. The company monitors every move of both permanent and temporary employees to meet intense demands for high-speed delivery. But is it paying enough attention to workplace safety?...“When Amazon lobbies for lucrative tax breaks, it is asking the public to become partners in its business – to the tune of billions of dollars...If we’re partners, we have a right to demand the highest standards for workplace safety.”

The Guardian:  Post-hurricane cleanup could kill more workers than storms themselves -- 10/23/17

...[A]ccording to Jessica Martinez, executive director of National Council of Occupation Safety and Health (Cosh), a nationwide network of workplace health and safety groups, a greater number of people will die cleaning up in their wake “if more resources aren’t put into health and safety training from post-cleanup”...“It’s not OK to just get some masks from the 99 cents store, which we hear happens a lot. You have to get real equipment like N-95,” said Martinez, referring to the $8 respirator that the federal National Institute for Occupational and Safety Health recommends for this kind of work...If a worker insists on their federal rights, they can easily be fired and replaced by the multitude of day laborers crowding street corners looking for cleanup work. To combat this pressure, groups like Cosh and Workers Defense Project have begun training organizers to teach workers about how they can protect themselves against hurricane cleanup hazards. "There are negotiations skills that need to happen for day laborers when they are asking for the proper equipment,” said Martinez. “It’s quite complex in terms of how to train and educate day laborers to ask for their rights.” Last month, Martinez flew down to Texas with a team of workplace safety experts, who trained more than 60 organizers in how to educate workers.

WorkersCompensation: NY Safety And Health Advocates Hosted Day Of Action & Delivered Tens Of Thousands Of Postcards Against Proposed Benefit Cuts To Injured Workers -- 10/19/17

According to a document released on the New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health website, the proposed guidelines were “toxic” for injured workers and could lead to the ultimate destruction of the New York State Workers' Compensation System...Leading the post card delivery in Brooklyn, New York, Charlene Obernauer, Executive Director at NYCOSH stated, 'We're delivering these petition cards to call on the New York State Workers' Compensation Board to protect New York's injured workers. It's that simple. These proposed guidelines have no basis in medical science and need to be unilaterally rejected. We're sick of the attack on injured workers, and we're here to say that injured New Yorkers deserve better than to have their benefits taken away.' 

State of Politics:  Advocates Fret Workers Comp Changes -- 10/19/17

" 'We’re delivering these petition cards to call on the New York State Workers’ Compensation Board to protect New York’s injured workers,” said Charlene Obernauer, the executive director of New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health. “It’s that simple. These proposed guidelines have no basis in medical science and need to be unilaterally rejected. We’re sick of the attack on injured workers, and we’re here to say that injured New Yorkers deserve better than to have their benefits taken away.' "

WorkCompCentral: Activists Protest Proposed WCB Changes to Impairment Rating Method -- 10/19/17

"The New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health has come out strongly against the proposed rules, which are in the public comment period. The group has created a graphic that it says explains what would happen if the "business-first guidelines" were adopted. Its executive director, Charlene Obernauer, provided the quote whose sentiment activists have adopted: 'New Yorkers deserve better than to have their benefits taken away.' "

MassLive: Massachusetts Senate bill would extend OSHA safety standards to all public workers -- 10/9/17

"Public employees repair our roads, remove our waste, care for our disabled and more, exposing themselves to proven hazards that cause needless injury," said Jodi Sugerman-Brozan, executive director of MassCOSH, the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health, in a statement.

Safety+Health: Stricter rules, increased corporate responsibility needed to protect temp workers: report -- 10/9/17

Staffing agencies that hire temporary workers need to be regulated more vigorously, and employers that use those agencies should carry a heavier load of responsibility for workers’ safety, a trio of Temple University law students concluded in a recent report examining how staffing agencies and host employers may “pass the buck” to get around proper safety training and other requirements...The Philadelphia Area Project on Occupational Safety and Health contributed to the report.

WBJournal: OSHA protection bill clears Senate -- 10/5/17

An average of 28 municipal workers per week suffer injuries serious enough to be out of work for five days or more, according to Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health executive director Jodi Sugerman-Brozan, who cheered the bill's passage as "a critical step."..."Public employees repair our roads, remove our waste, care for our disabled and more, exposing themselves to proven hazards that cause needless injury," Sugerman-Brozan said.

EHSToday: Two Worker Deaths in September at Different Amazon Warehouses Spawn Concern from Worker Advocates -- 10/5/17

“Getting consumer goods dropped right on your doorstep is nice, but who is paying the price?” asked Jessica Martinez, co-executive director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH). “There is a disturbing pattern of preventable deaths at Amazon. Two workers have been crushed to death by forklifts, one dragged into a conveyor belt, another crushed by a pallet loader and one run over by a truck. The company monitors every move of both permanent and temporary employees to meet intense demands for high-speed delivery. But is it paying enough attention to workplace safety?...When Amazon lobbies for lucrative tax breaks, it is asking the public to become partners in its business – to the tune of billions of dollars...If we’re partners, we have a right to demand the highest standards for workplace safety.”

NH Labor News: Three Deaths After 1,000-Foot Fall in Miami Are Latest of More Than 130 Tower Fatalities -- 10/3/17

“Our prayers are with the families of the victims of this terrible tragedy,” said Jeanette Smith, executive director of South Florida Interfaith Worker Justice, a founding member of the South Florida Council on Occupational Safety and Health (South Florida COSH). “We will remember Brachton Barber, Benito Rodriguez and Marcus Goffena and honor their lives by insisting on the highest safety standards for all workers.”

“These fatalities in Miami are the most recent needless deaths in an industry where reckless actions by employers have cost the lives of scores of workers,” said Marcy Goldstein-Gelb, executive director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH). “We need answers and a full investigation – including an analysis of steps the employer took – or failed to take – to provide a fall protection system and to assess the structural integrity of the tower and related equipment....We know from experience that in almost all cases, workplace fatalities can be prevented...It’s crucial that employers be held accountable for safety program lapses. Workers who die on their job and their families deserve no less – and workers who face similar risks in the future must be protected.”

EHS Today: Three Workers Fall Nearly 1,000 Feet to their Deaths from a South Florida Television Tower -- 10/3/17

Marcy Goldstein-Gelb, executive director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH), said the recent fatalities in Miami “are the most recent needless deaths in an industry where reckless actions by employers have cost the lives of scores of workers. We need answers and a full investigation, including an analysis of steps the employer took – or failed to take – to provide a fall protection system and to assess the structural integrity of the tower and related equipment.”

September 2017

Houston Public Media: Harvey Means More Jobs. But Does It Mean More Exploitation Too? -- 9/30/17

...Marianela Acuña Arreaza, Executive Director of the Fe y Justicia Worker Center, said recovery storm work augments already existing problems. “After a storm, there is definitely the urgency to get a lot of work done…. But at the same time, protecting people’s ability to take breaks when they need them. Especially when they’re still dealing with other safety risks. For example, like heat and lack of ventilation and things like that,” said Acuña. “That always exist in Houston, even before storm, but is so much worse after.”...Acuña said wage theft is already a huge issue in Texas, and she has already received complaints from workers who say they are victims of wage theft from Harvey-related work.

Times UnionAssembly Democrats fight against proposed worker rules -- 9/27/17

According to the New York Committee For Occupational Safety and Health, a workers' rights group, the proposed rules would give company-assigned doctors the power to suspend care and slash protections by eliminating payments for injuries to worker such as fractures or ligament and tendon tears...Nadia Marin-Molina, associate director at NYCOSH, said in a statement that "the Workers' Comp Board was given the mandate to make recommendations to revise the injury payment amounts that workers receive when they are injured on the job. Without any regard for injured workers or medical science, the Workers' Compensation Board issued protection-slashing guidelines."

Arizona Daily Star: Union workers confront Ariz. commission over penalty reductions for safety violations -- 9/24/17

Arizona’s state OSHA program has a history of requiring pressure from the feds to aggressively enforce safety rules, said Peter Dooley, a Tucson-based workplace safety consultant with the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health.

Weekly Safety: National Council for Occupational Safety & Health #COSHCON17 

EHSToday: Let’s Get To Work (But Not at the Expense of Worker Safety) --9/21/17

Caller Times: Let’s get back to work post-Harvey — safely -- 9/19/17

Times Union: Mission for safety in disaster's wake -- 9/15/17

Rossana Coto-Batres, a social worker from Albany, was in Houston this week to train outreach workers who will spread out to the city's street corners with a message of safe work practices for the men and women waiting to be picked up for the cleanup work around the city following Hurricane Harvey. Coto-Batres, 31, is the education and training coordinator for the Northeast NY Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (COSH)...Staff from the Fe y Justicia Worker Center in Houston gave Coto-Batres and other COSH visitors a tour when they arrived. 

LaborPress: Sixteen Years After 9/11, Worker-Safety Issues Remain -- 9/14/17

The 9/11 cleanup was “by no means a case study in how to work safely,” said Charlene Obernauer, executive director of the New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health...The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health estimates that more than 400,000 people were exposed, the about 90,000 “responders” who responded to the attack or worked on the cleanup, and the rest the “survivors,” who lived, worked, or went to school in Lower Manhattan, said Liam Lynch of NYCOSH, a program coordinator for the World Trade Center Health Program...Construction is “the most dangerous industry in New York City and has been for some time,” said Obernauer...There are three prongs to safety, said Obernauer: Enforcing current regulations, training, and reporting unsafe conditions. But the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration, she added, has fewer inspectors in New York State than it did five years ago. Then, it would have taken 111 years to inspect every worksite in the state; now, it would take 138 years. “It does seem pretty basic, but we know what works,” she said.

NH Labor NewsAfter Harvey, Immigrant and Labor Rights Groups Team Up to Provide Ongoing Health and Safety Training for Reconstruction Workers -- 9/14/17

WAMC Northeast Public Radio: Albany Native Lends A Hand In Hurricane-Ravaged Houston -- 9/14/17

ThinkProgress: Lost wages, serious illness and poor labor standards: The dangers of rebuilding Texas and Florida -- 9/11/17

Marcy Goldstein-Gelb, co-executive director for the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, said the program has been a “critical resource” for organizations and training groups to be able to partner with employers and educate workers. “They can identify hazards and prevent the need for OSHA to have to enforce after the fact,” Goldstein-Gelb said.

August 2017

Business Insurance: Unions, industry at odds over beryllium rule revisions -- 8/31/2017

“We strongly oppose every provision of OSHA's new proposal that revokes the ancillary provisions for the construction and ship yard sectors that OSHA had already adopted on Jan. 9, 2017,” Jessica Martinez, deputy director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, said in comments published on Aug. 25 and echoed by other organizations. “The agency must not revoke any of the provisions promulgated in the final rules on Jan. 9, and they must assure that the full standards are implemented as published. Adopting any of the provisions in this new proposal would lead to more death and disease among exposed shipyard and construction workers. We strongly oppose this proposal and its mission to create a two-tiered system of protection for workers exposed to beryllium. OSHA must move forward and implement the rules as promulgated.”

The Asbestos Disease Awareness OrganizationMessage of Support from National COSH: Asbestos is unsafe at any level. Let’s get rid of it -- 8/29/17

National COSH fully supports the petition initiated by the Asbestos Disease and Awareness Organization (ADAO), calling on EPA to use its existing authority to promptly ban asbestos in the United States, with no exceptions or loopholes. Refinery workers, shipyard workers, firefighters, construction workers and many others face daily exposure to a substance that can ruin their lungs and take their lives.

Oye! TimesAmerica’s Deadliest Employers -- 8/2/17

A recent report from the National Council on Occupational Safety and Health looks at which companies in America (and one in South Korea) have the worst records when it comes to on-the-job worker fatalities. The report, “The Dirty Dozen“, looks at the 12 employers that put their workers at risk due to unsafe workplace practices.

June 2017

Safety + Health: Budget hearing: Acosta says DOL committed to enforcement; critics claim otherwise -- 6/28/17

Prior to the hearing, advocacy group National Council for Occupational Safety and Health issued a press release projecting OSHA would conduct 2,300 fewer inspections. National COSH highlighted two other proposals the group believes are detrimental to worker safety and health: a $6 million cut for the Mine Safety and Health Administration’s inspection budget and the elimination of the Susan Harwood Training Grant Program. “We need stronger – not weaker – protections and enforcement in our workplaces,” Jessica Martinez, National COSH co-executive director, said in the release. “Cutting back on inspections and training puts workers at greater risk of getting sick, getting injured or even getting killed on the job.”

Safety + HealthBeryllium rule: OSHA seeks to eliminate provisions aimed at construction, shipyard workers -- 6/27/17

Jessica Martinez, co-executive director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, called the measure “a step backwards” in a statement released June 23. “[OSHA] spent more than a decade on the rulemaking process for the standard that would be severely weakened by the proposal announced today,” Martinez said. “It is well documented that shipyard and construction workers can be exposed to beryllium. They need the same protections as other workers – including monitoring and assessing exposure to potential harm and taking steps to eliminate hazards which can lead to life-threatening diseases.”

EHS TodayA Proposed Rule for Beryllium… Again -- 6/26/17

Jessica Martinez, co-executive director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH), appears to take issue with claims that OSHA did not properly vet the beryllium standard before including the construction and shipyard industries. She pointed out that OSHA “spent more than a decade on the rulemaking process for the standard that would be severely weakened by the proposal... It is well documented that shipyard and construction workers can be exposed to beryllium. They need the same protections as other workers – including monitoring and assessing exposure to potential harm and taking steps to eliminate hazards which can lead to life-threatening diseases.”

OH&SOSHA Leaving Beryllium Exposure Limits Intact for Construction, Shipyards -- 6/26/17

Jessica Martinez, co-executive director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH), responded critically. "No matter where they work, U.S. workers deserve protection from exposure to hazardous – and potentially lethal – toxic materials. The proposal announced [June 23] by the U.S. Department of Labor to weaken standards that limit exposure to beryllium for shipyard and construction workers is a step backwards. Beryllium can cause debilitating lung disease as well as lung cancer. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration spent more than a decade on the rulemaking process for the standard that would be severely weakened by the proposal announced today. It is well documented that shipyard and construction workers can be exposed to beryllium. They need the same protections as other workers – including monitoring and assessing exposure to potential harm and taking steps to eliminate hazards which can lead to life-threatening diseases."

The Hill: Make America’s classroom and workplaces safe again -- 6/23/17

Its critics call the Harwood grants "inefficient." They might talk to people at the National Council on Occupational Safety and Health. They set out to train vulnerable workers with limited English. They met their goal last year—3 months early. That sounds efficient to us.

SalonJobs to die for: New report cites “dirty dozen” companies -- 6/12/17

Last week the National Council on Occupational Safety and Health, a federation with 21 affiliates in 15 states, observed Workers’ Memorial Week, a tribute to workers who have died on the job, by releasing a 27-page report about employer practices that put wage-earners at risk. The council dubbed the companies with the worst records the “Dirty Dozen 2017"...The group collected data for the Dirty Dozen from its affiliates’ network, as well as from community and labor allies, said Jessica Martinez, NCOSH’s co-executive director.

NH13 NH workers killed on job within days of each other -- 6/7/17

Three men were killed on the job in unrelated incidents on May 16, 17 and 23, according to the New Hampshire Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health. Christopher S. Hewey, 37 of East Alstead, died in Acworth in a trench collapse on May 16. George Moran, 70, died on May 17 in Wolfeboro after falling from a scaffold and Frederick Wilhelmi, 32 of Hudson, died May 23 while working for a tree service company. "These workplace fatalities are tragic and needless," said Brian Mitchell of NH COSH. "Most, if not all, workplace deaths are preventable using well-established safety measures."

Arizona Daily StarPeter Dooley: Is Arizona letting employers off the hook for safety violations? -- 6/7/17

Instead of squaring off with OSHA to defend its right to let employers off the hook, the ICA should team up with state and federal partners to focus on what’s important: Safety on the job for Arizona workers.

Wisconsin State FarmerDeaths at WI mill show need for enforcement of safety laws -- 6/4/17

From long and sad experience, we know that most of the events in which workers become sick, are injured, or lose their lives are preventable,” said Marcy Goldstein Gelb, executive director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH). “All employers must take pro-active steps to reduce workplace risks – but we can’t rely on voluntary action. OSHA needs resources to inspect workplaces issue fines and penalties, which have an important deterrent effect."

May 2017

RevealSenators want probe of Labor Department secrecy, policy delays -- 5/20/17

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health estimated that the new rule would save 600 lives a year. But the US Chamber of Commerce, oil and gas lobbyists and other industry groups railed against the rule, saying it was unnecessary and would cost billions.

Bloomberg BNA: Arizona Improperly Lowered Safety Fines, OSHA Says -- 5/18/17

Arizona officials improperly reduced safety and health violation fines in some cases considered by the Industrial Commission of Arizona, the agency that oversees Arizona’s Division of Occupational Safety and Health, according to a letter from federal OSHA. OSHA’s review of Arizona commission practices was prompted by the complaint of private safety consultant, Peter Dooley, to the agency and an investigation by the Arizona Star, a Tucson newspaper...[t]he letter was provided to Bloomberg BNA by the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health.

Arizona Capitol TimesFeds warn Arizona about lowering workplace injury fines -- 5/17/17

The federal agency investigated after a December complaint from a workplace safety group known as the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health. The agency had been monitoring state commission meetings for months previously...“When you reduce fines and downgrade violations again and again, you’re sending a message that workers’ lives are not valued,” Peter Dooley, Tucson-based project safety consultant for the group, said in a statement.

Safety + HealthDemocrats introduce bill to restore ‘Volks’ recordkeeping rule -- 5/17/17

“Tens of thousands of Americans die every year from preventable illnesses and injuries in the workplace, and millions more are hurt on the job,” Marcy Goldstein Gelb, National COSH co-executive director, said in a May 15 press release. “If we let employers get away with failing to report safety problems, we’re putting workers at risk. It’s also unfair to responsible companies who keep accurate records; they deserve a level playing field.”

Arizona Daily StarArizona commission improperly slashes workplace safety penalties, feds say -- 5/16/17

“The big question is what the implication of this will be, in terms of the follow-up the state does to address these concerns,” said Peter Dooley, a Tucson-based workplace safety consultant with the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health. Dooley said scrutiny from the Star over the course of six months in 2016, and the resulting December 2016 Star article on the commission’s practices, helped drive federal OSHA’s investigation. “That certainly brought attention to the issue...There’s no question that played a role.”

The Pump HandleCriticism of Arizona’s arbitrary reduction in workplace safety penalties -- 5/16/17

Peter Dooley with the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health explained to the Star’s Emily Bregel one of several concerns about the ICA’s involvement in reviewing ADOSH’s findings: Commissioners are “so far removed from what’s happening at that workplace….[it] seems like a process fraught with problems.” 

Capital & Main: Jobs to Die For: Report Cites “Dirty Dozen” Companies -- 5/3/17

Last week the National Council on Occupational Safety and Health, a federation with 21 affiliates in 15 states, observed Workers’ Memorial Week, a tribute to workers who have died on the job, by releasing a 27-page report about employer practices that put wage-earners at risk. The council dubbed the companies with the worst records the “Dirty Dozen 2017.” Of the 12 employers, three have California headquarters. The group collected data for the Dirty Dozen from its affiliates’ network, as well as from community and labor allies, said Jessica Martinez, NCOSH’s co-executive director, on a call to Capital & Main. The criteria included injury severity, state and federal authorities’ sanctions and workers’ activities to improve their job conditions.

People's WorldWorker safety group names the most dangerous employers -- 5/2/17

Among the companies the Council for Occupational Safety and Health (COSH) identifies as this year’s Dirty Dozen are a Boston contractor whose indifference to safety led to the deaths of two workers in a trench collapse and a Lansing, Illinois, tanker cleaning service that did nothing to prevent fumes from filling a tank car and killing an employee...National COSH released its report in advance of Workers Memorial Day, this past April 28, unveiling it at a press conference April 26. 

glassBYTEs: Fuyao’s Ohio Facility Named in the National COSH 2017 “Dirty Dozen” Report -- 5/1/17 

In observance of Workers’ Memorial Week, a global event meant to honor workers who’ve died or have been injured at the workplace, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (NCOSH) announced “The Dirty Dozen” employers of 2017...Jessica Martinez, co-executive director of NCOSH, explains that the “Dirty Dozen” report is a call to action for these employers to eliminate unsafe practices for the betterment of its employees and workplace environment.

April 2017

The Detriot News: Michigan workplace fatalities highest in a decade -- 4/29/17 

Peter Dooley, senior project coordinator for the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, said Michigan could do more to reduce on the job deaths. He said the Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s fines for fatalities and serious violations are “pitifully low” when compared with other states and federal enforcement. “This sends a message that it’s cheaper to violate health and safety standards rather than comply,” he said. 

Univision: Estudios revelan que los hispanos mantienen la tasa más alta de mortalidad en el trabajo en EEUU -- 4/28/17

El Consejo Nacional para la Salud y Seguridad Laboral (COSH), una organización privada sin ánimo de lucro, advirtió en vísperas de este día conmemorativo que la situación podría empeorar si el endurecimiento de políticas migratorias obliga a los indocumentados a vivir en la sombra. "La realidad es que los latinos son asignados frecuentemente a los trabajos más peligrosos y sucios", denunció la codirectora ejecutiva de COSH Jessica Martínez, en declaraciones recogidas por Efe. "Estos no son problemas nuevos, pero son urgentes..." El Consejo Nacional para la Salud y Seguridad Laboral (COSH) denuncia que la amenaza del gobierno de Donald Trump de endurecer las deportaciones de indocumentados también puede tener un impacto en los trabajadores hispanos, así como el anuncio de recortes de presupuestos a la Administración de Seguridad y Salud Ocupacional (OSHA).

The Pump Handle: Worst of the worst for worker rights and safety: “Dirty Dozen” profiled in new report -- 4/28/17 

Who would do such things? Regrettably, far too many employers and 12 of them are profiled in the report “The Dirty Dozen 2017: Employers who put workers & communities at risk.” It was released this week by the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) as part of global commemorations of Worker Memorial Day.

KMEX-TV: 'Los Ángeles en un Minuto': trabajadores latinos tienen la tasa de mortalidad más alta comparada con otros grupos, según informe del Concejo Nacional de Salud -- 4/27/17

EHSTodayThree of the Dirty Dozen: Dedicated TCS, Nissan USA and Pilgrim’s Pride --4/27/17

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) recently named 12 employers to its “Dirty Dozen” list for 2017. You can find the entire “Dirty Dozen 2017: Employers Who Put Workers & Communities at Risk” on the National COSH web site...

Hoy: Hispanos mantienen más alta tasa de mortalidad en trabajo, según datos -- 4/27/17 Los trabajadores hispanos mantienen la más alta tasa de mortalidad en el lugar de trabajo en el país, situación que podría empeorar si el endurecimiento de políticas migratorias obliga a los indocumentados a vivir en las sombras, alertó hoy el Consejo Nacional para la Salud y Seguridad Laboral (COSH)..."La realidad es que los latinos son asignados frecuentemente a los trabajos más peligrosos y sucios", acusó hoy Jessica Martínez, codirectora ejecutiva de COSH durante una conferencia telefónica...Estos no son problemas nuevos, pero son urgentes."

Safety+Health: Safety advocates call for stronger protections during Workers’ Memorial Week -- 4/27/17

The AFL-CIO, National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, and the National Safety Council are among the organizations renewing the call for improved worker protections as part of Workers’ Memorial Week...National COSH on April 26 revealed its annual list of The Dirty Dozen, calling out U.S. companies that the organization claims have jeopardized worker safety. “These companies are putting workers at risk, as well as their families and surrounding communities,” National COSH Co-Executive Director Jessica Martinez said during an April 26 press conference. The report cites an OSHA estimate that each workplace fatality costs the U.S. economy $8.7 million when factors such as legal costs, medical costs, lost productivity and new worker training are taken into account.

MLive: Why so many workers are falling to their deaths in Michigan -- 4/27/17 

Inspections can't take the place of strong enforcement, argued Peter Dooley, senior project coordinator for the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health. "The thing that people don't realize is there's not a state or federal agency that will inspect workplaces regularly...You need to have strong enforcement in public so that employers know there is a disincentive if they don't have good safety programs." 

Boston Globe: On-the-job deaths hit 10-year high -- 4/27/17

Marcy Goldstein-Gelb, co-executive director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, said the rise in deaths reflects the increase in workers employed by subcontractors and staffing agencies that are less invested in worker safety.

InsideOSHAOnline: Safety Coalition Pushes Back Against Likely Trump Cuts To OSHA In FY18 -- 4/26/17

The coalition, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (NCOSH), released an April 26 report, “The Dirty Dozen: Employers Who Put Workers & Communities at Risk,” that charges that proposed cuts to DOL will reduce OSHA enforcement, which has helped drive a decline in worker deaths since the Occupational Safety and Health Act was enacted in 1970.“Fewer resources for inspection, investigation and enforcement will mean more injuries and fatalities in U.S. Workplaces,” the report says. Citing OSHA estimates, the group says each worker death costs $8.7 million in expenses and lost productivity. “A workplace death is also a highly disruptive and expensive event for employers." 

Dayton Daily News: Fuyao makes ‘The Dirty Dozen’ list of national companies -- 4/26/17

Fuyao Glass America was named to “The Dirty Dozen” employers list, which highlights U.S. companies that a safety organization say put workers at risk through unsafe practices. The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health releases the list in observance of Workers’ Memorial Week, honoring workers who lost their lives on the job. 

WHIO: Fuyao makes ‘The Dirty Dozen’ list of national companies -- 4/26/17

Fuyao Glass America was named to “The Dirty Dozen” employers list, which highlights U.S. companies that a safety organization say put workers at risk through unsafe practices. The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health releases the list in observance of Workers’ Memorial Week, honoring workers who lost their lives on the job. 

ISHN: Naming names: “The Dirty Dozen” IDs the worst safety violators -- 4/26/17

A glass company that doesn’t allow employees to wear gloves. A fire disaster waiting to happen. A severe violator who had two workers drown in a trench. These were among the employers named in this year’s “Dirty Dozen,” a list of nation’s worst safety offenders compiled annually by National COSH, a coalition health and safety organizations that advocate for the elimination of preventable hazards in the workplace. 

EHSToday: He Died Standing: Tales from the ‘Dirty Dozen' -- 4/26/17

The "Dirty Dozen 2017" report – which highlights 12 companies that put workers and communities at risk due to unsafe practices – was released on April 26 in observance of Workers’ Memorial Week, which honors workers who lost their lives on the job and their families. The list was created by the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) with input from its network of 21 COSH groups in 15 states and worker advocates around the country...“Every day in the United States, workers are getting hurt, getting sick and dying from preventable causes,” said Jessica Martinez. “We know how to make our workplaces safer. We’re calling on these companies to implement effective health and safety programs including, which must include worker participation. These firms need to eliminate workplace hazards and take action so that every worker can return home safely at the end of his or her shift.”

EHSToday: OSHA Delays Enforcement of Crystalline Silica Standard in the Construction Industry -- 4/7/17

With construction season underway, “three months of delay means that millions of workers will be exposed to hazardous silica dust that will make them sick and take their lives,” said Marcy Goldstein-Gelb, co-executive director of National COSH. “Tools to wet down silica dust and vacuum it up are practical, affordable and readily available. The new standard was announced more than a year ago and employers are aware of their responsibilities to limit worker exposure. To protect workers, the time to act is now.”

The Daily Reporter: OSHA delays enforcement of silica rule -- 4/6/17

Jessica Martinez, co-executive director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, on Friday slammed the proposed delay to the silica rule. In a written statement, Martinez said that although the delay is only by three months, it comes at a time when construction season will be in full swing, meaning that 2 million construction workers will potentially be exposed to dangerous levels of silica dust. “It is backed by solid scientific evidence and the experience of workers who have suffered cancer, silicosis and other life-threatening diseases,” she said. “There is no reason for delaying this rule, which will save more 600 lives each year.”

March 2017

WTNH NEWS8: Sen. Blumenthal to help lead workplace safety legislation -- 3/27/17

Representatives of the construction trades in Connecticut (a ConnectiCOSH-led delegation) joined with Senator Richard Blumenthal Monday in denouncing Republican-led votes in the U.S. Senate that will rollback major workplace safety regulations...“OSHA’s our police so when you start taking away their ability to do their job it’s just like police not being able to go out there on the streets and make them safe. To ‘serve and protect’ is what OSHA does to us,” said David Roche, President of CT Building Trades.

Safety + Health: National COSH releases ‘action agenda’ for protecting workers -- 3/15/17

More needs to be done to protect workers, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health says. More than 90 other organizations agree. Those groups have endorsed National COSH’s action agenda, Protecting Workers’ Lives and Limbs, released March 15. “We can’t wait for tragedy to strike before we take action,” Jessica Martinez, co-executive director of National COSH, said in a press release. “We have to improve our safety laws and insist on tough enforcement before workers are hurt or killed on the job.”

February 2017

The Boston GlobeBoston drain firm indicted in fatal trench collapse -- 2/8/17

...The indictments are a “very important, bold step” in enforcing workplace safety laws, said Marcy Goldstein-Gelb of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health. “This isn’t something that has happened frequently in Massachusetts, but it’s a growing tool that DAs are recognizing” is available “when there are employers that recklessly put their employees in harm’s way. . . . This was so egregious.”

January 2017

Payday ReportSpike in Latino Workplace Deaths Has Many Worried About Trump Era -- 1/25/17

Today, the Trump Administration announced a series of moves designed to crack down on undocumented workers living in the country, promising in immigration-related executive orders to target and deport immigrants who have entered the United States illegally and foreign guestworkers that overstay their work visas...Activists say that, with a likely weakened OSHA and undocumented workers heightened fears, it will be up to them to do even more education and organizing to make workers feel comfortable speaking up for safety.

Safety + Health: Construction worker deaths on the rise throughout New York: report -- 1/25/17

Construction worker fatalities have been rising in New York City and throughout the state - and Latino workers are particularly at risk due to falls and willful violations - according to an annual report released Jan. 18 by the New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health

Insurance Journal: Report Finds New York Construction Fatalities, Regulatory Violations Rising -- 1/24/17 

The New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (NYCOSH) found in its latest construction fatality report that construction worker deaths are rising in New York, and many construction employers across the state are consistently violating regulations and code requirements. 

EHS Today"Workers Falling Out of the Sky": NYCOSH Report Reveals Uptick in New York Construction Fatalities -- 1/19/17

The New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (NYCOSH) along with members from Greater New York LECET, the Building and Construction Trades Council, New York City Council members and community organizations gathered Jan. 18 to release its latest construction fatality report, "Deadly Skyline" An Annual Report on Construction Fatalities in New York State." 

The New York Times: 2 Years, 31 Dead Construction Workers. New York Can Do Better -- 1/16/17

Between 2011 and 2015, the number of building permits issued in New York City jumped by more than 18 percent, but the number of OSHA inspectors for all of New York State dropped by more than 13 percent (as of 2014, there were only 71 in the state). 

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