You are here

New Website Features Workers’ Stories: Speak Up For Safe Work

National COSH, with help from local COSH partners, has launched SpeakUp4SafeWork.org, a bilingual website that tells the stories of American workers facing daily hazards on the job. The new site will be a resource for activists, journalists, policy makers and the public, giving workers a chance to shine a light on the dangerous conditions that exist in many American workplaces.

Too often, we only hear about workplace hazards after a disaster occurs, or when an employer is cited following a state or federal investigation. SpeakUp4SafeWork gives working people an opportunity to describe, in their own words, the risks they face at work and the ways in which employers retaliate when workers demand their right to a safe workplace.

Stories featured on the new site include:

  • Henry Johnson, a demolition worker assigned to a temp agency who was placed on a lead abatement site without proper protection from contamination;
  • Pedro Covarubia, a construction worker who was denied medical attention on the job after a severe back injury;
  • Sharon H., a physical therapist who was attacked by one of her patients;
  • Pedro Cosme, an agricultural worker who suffered serious injuries when struck by a tractor;
  • Tomas Garcia, fired by his employer after reporting an injury while working in the kitchen of a well-known Boston hotel.

SpeakUp4SafeWork also tells the stories of workers who lost their lives on the job, as detailed in Preventable Deaths 2014, a Workers Memorial Week report from National COSH.

Visitors to the site can contribute their own stories about workplace safety and health issues, using an interactive on-line interview tool available in both Spanish and English.

“Our fight for safer working conditions has to be grounded in the real-life experience of working people,” says National COSH Executive Director Mary Vogel. “Our local COSH partners and their member activists have done a great service by gathering these important stories. By making sure their voices are heard, we can help workers stay safe on the job.”

Share/Save