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National COSH Releases Report Commemorating 100th Anniversary of Triangle Shirtwaist Co. Fire

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March 24, 2011 (WASHINGTON, D.C.) – The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, together with the Cry Wolf Project released today a report commemorating the 100th Anniversary of the deadly Triangle Shirtwaist Co. fire, which took place in New York City on March 25, 1911.
 
“This fire was one of America’s greatest tragedies; 146 workers – most of them young women and girls – lost their lives in a conflagration that was entirely preventable. It didn’t have to happen, and to make matters worse, while we have made great progress with respect to protecting workers on the job today, too many voices in industry and business continue to make the same arguments today that were made in opposition to workplace protections that could have save lives at the Triangle Shirtwaist factory 100 years ago,” Tom O’Connor, the Executive Director of the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health.
 
O’Connor said copies of the report have been hand-delivered to every member of Congress, as well as to staffers connected with key legislative committees.
 
The report can be viewed online at http://www.coshnetwork.org/image/tid/5,
 
The report itself is divided into three parts:
 

  • a proposal for much-needed reform for our system of protecting America’s workers
  • a review of the worst industrial disasters in the past 100 years since the Triangle Shirtwaist fire, and,
  • a reminder that the headline-grabbing disasters are only part of the story.

 
“It is truly remarkable that the arguments that were made 100 years ago against protecting workers continue to be made today,” O’Connor said. “While this report is intended to commemorate the deaths of those young people who lost their lives 100 years ago, it is also intended to remind us – and particularly the members of Congress who had copies of this report hand-delivered to their respective offices – that we have a long way to go to ensure that every worker goes home safe and sound at the end of the day.”
 
The Cry Wolf Project is a research network that identifies and exposes misleading rhetoric about the economy and government.
 
The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health is a federation of local and statewide organizations; a private, non-profit coalition of labor unions, health and technical professionals, and others interested in promoting and advocating for worker health and safety. 
 
To learn more about the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, go to: http://www.coshnetwork.org/.
 

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